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Texas Tech gives 'Fearless Dreams Kids' their big moment

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Two Fearless Dream Kids join Texas Tech football (0:41)

Andrew and Braden, who are Fearless Dreams kids for Texas Tech's spring football game, each score touchdowns and celebrate with the Red Raiders in the end zone. (0:41)

FRISCO, Texas -- Texas Tech’s run game got a boost from two special young fans during their spring game Saturday afternoon.

The Red Raiders brought in Andrew and Braden, their “Fearless Dreams Kids,” for a scrimmage at the Ford Center at The Star in Frisco, Texas. The boys spent the day with the team thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation and even got in on the action in the second half.

Braden, an 11-year-old from Southlake, Texas, dressed up in a Texas Tech helmet, jersey and pads and got into the game at receiver. He took a handoff on a reverse and cut through the Red Raiders’ defense for a 10-yard touchdown.

“I saw one guy dive at my feet, so I had to jump back a little,” Braden said, "and I had good blockers.”

Receiver Quan Shorts lifted him up in the air and all of his Texas Tech teammates rushed the field to mob Braden. Then they got lined up and put Andrew, a 12-year-old from Hurst, Texas, into the ballgame. He made his touchdown look easy.

“I knew in warmups that they had something special,” Texas Tech coach Kliff Kingsbury said afterward. “They had great attitudes, were running around there fitting in with the guys, so I expected them to play well and they did.”

The boys received care packages from Texas Tech in the mail as well as an invitation to join them in Frisco for the scrimmage. They spent the day on the field hanging out with Tech players and even caught passes from Kingsbury during warmups.

After the spring game, Andrew and Braden joined Kingsbury for his news conference.

“Thank you for letting us do this,” Andrew told Kingsbury. “You guys played good.”

They both said they want to attend Texas Tech when they grow up.

“Let me just say this about them: They’re two of the most polite and respectful young men you could work with,” Kingsbury said. “They did a great job. They were thanking everybody and had great attitudes. Very impressive young men.”