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B1G Roundtable: Lowlights from first half

We’ve already looked at the highlights to the first half of the season. So, naturally, we also thought we’d take a look at the lowlights.

What were the worst moments the Big Ten had to offer so far this season? What were some of the worst plays? The worst trends? Here’s a look at some of the things that won’t be making highlight videos any time soon, the lowlights to the first half of the season:

Brian Bennett: Night games in Week 2

The night time was not the right time for the Big Ten in Week 2. A highly-anticipated trio of prime-time games all ended up duds for the league, as Michigan State lost by 19 points at Oregon, Ohio State fell by 14 points at home to Virginia Tech and Michigan capitulated in a 31-0 loss at Notre Dame. You could almost feel the air drain out of the conference's playoff hopes on just the second Saturday of the season. The Spartans' loss didn't sink their College Football Playoff hopes, and the young Buckeyes have bounced back strongly (sorry, we can't say the same about Michigan). But the results of Week 2 will reverberate for a long time, and quite possibly inside the playoff selection committee war room on the first weekend in December.

Adam Rittenberg: The broken record with Michigan's offense

Yes, the Wolverines had a nice reprieve Saturday night, but it has more to do with their defense and Penn State's offensive ineptitude. Michigan is tied for 104th nationally in sacks allowed (17), 110th in first downs per game (18) and tied for 119th in turnovers (16). New coordinator Doug Nussmeier hasn't fixed the problems, and things don't get any easier with Michigan State up next.

Josh Moyer: Penn State offensive lineman blocking a teammate

The struggles of this offensive line are well-documented: Only eight teams in the FBS have allowed more sacks and only nine teams have rushed for fewer yards per game. This is the worst offensive line in the Big Ten and possibly the worst in the Power Five. But it reached a new low against Northwestern when one offensive guard blindly blocked a fellow offensive tackle on a 4th-and-1 play. (Needless to say, that rush went for minus-2 yards.) The video went viral and served as the symbol for just poorly this unit has played. No reprieve is in sight.

Dan Murphy: Michigan's Shane Morris mistakes

Allowing a potentially concussed player back on to a football field in 2014 isn't acceptable, but it's at least somewhat understandable that signals could be crossed on a hectic sideline to create such a blatant blunder. It's much harder to understand how those signals remained crossed for the better part of the week that followed while Michigan's athletic department tried to explain how woozy quarterback Shane Morris returned to action in a loss to Minnesota. Inconsistent reports and middle-of-the-night press releases exacerbated the problem and revealed at least a temporary level of dysfunction inside the proud program's athletic operations.

Mitch Sherman: Nebraska's first half at Michigan State

The Huskers went to Spartan Stadium on Oct. 4 with an opportunity to show the Big Ten, if not the nation, that they were on the road to reclaim attention, if not establish position as a darkhorse for the College Football Playoff. Nebraska did none of that in the first 30 minutes, falling behind 17-0 as it failed three times to capitalize on turnovers in Michigan State territory. The Huskers were tentative on offense as with nine first-half drives ended in seven punts, one interception and one fumble. Six of those possessions netted 6 yards or fewer. For the game, Nebraska's high-powered rushing attack gained just 47 yards. It did, though, stage a serious comeback in fourth quarter, falling 27-22 and left to wonder how a decent first half might have altered the outcome.

Austin Ward: Quarterbacks sabotaging Melvin Gordon and Wisconsin

The ultimate backfield weapon doesn’t need much help, but imagine what Melvin Gordon might be capable of with even an average passing game to complement his otherworldly rushing ability. The star running back is still gashing defenses on the ground, but any chance of dragging Wisconsin into the College Football Playoff was erased with Joel Stave catching a case of the yips, Tanner McEvoy throwing an interception for every 20 attempts and defenses responding by loading up the box. The Badgers could have been truly dangerous on offense, but instead they have almost entirely squandered what should be their last season with Gordon before the calendar even flips to November.