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Joe Maddon calls criticism of his postseason decisions 'humorous'

CHICAGO -- Although it has been an offseason of celebrating for Chicago Cubs skipper Joe Maddon, it has also been one of second-guessing for the reigning World Series champion manager. Every time Maddon has faced reporters this winter, he has been asked about his decisions in the final games of the Cubs' World Series win over the Cleveland Indians.

"I find it humorous that people want to go there," Maddon said Wednesday evening at his annual Thanksmas event in Chicago. "After all, we won 103 games. We had to beat the Giants, the Dodgers and the Indians to win the World Series, so we got through the NLDS, NLCS and WS. And people want to focus on one moment where I totally disagree with them, and I can't convince them of that. There's nothing I can do about perception and interpretation. That's up to the brain and the mind of the beholder. What I did I had planned before the game began."

Maddon didn't get into specifics, but he's referring to his pitching decisions, especially the ones involving Aroldis Chapman. The former Cubs closer was somewhat critical of how he was used in the postseason, though Maddon emphasized that he and the pitcher discussed everything beforehand.

"He was about as big a part of that run as anyone," Maddon said. "Everything that occurred was planned out in advance."

Maddon prefers to focus on the big-picture positives than the one or two particular moments that have stirred some emotions from critics.

"I prefer that everyone understand the magnitude of running the gauntlet of the Giants, the Dodgers and the Indians and how difficult it was to get to Game 7," he said. "We won the World Series, and everyone participated and had a role."

Maddon said he doesn't feel the need to talk to any of his players about what happened in the playoffs, though he will speak with catcher Miguel Montero, who was critical of how Maddon used him during the postseason.

"I'm sure we'll talk," Maddon said with a smile. "Miggy likes to talk."