Early Bengals camp notables (defense)

A look at a few Cincinnati Bengals offensive players who have made strong impressions through the first five practices of training camp:


Carlos Dunlap: Expectations are high for the fifth-year lineman this season. They're so high that defensive coordinator Paul Guenther has already told him he better be a Pro Bowl selection.

Margus Hunt: The second-year player told reporters in Cincinnati on Monday that he felt more comfortable at his position compared to last season, and that work going against offensive tackles Anthony Collins and Andre Smith as a scout-team rookie helped give him a better idea of how to attack opponents.

Wallace Gilberry: It's easy to forget Gilberry because of the attention paid to Hunt, the native Estonian who had a basic understanding of his position previous to the coaching he received this past year. Gilberry plays with a veteran's savvy and can be used at different spots depending upon the situation.


Brandon Thompson: With Geno Atkins still rehabbing from an ACL tear, and Devon Still slowly returning from a back injury, Thompson has had his share of repetitions on the line's interior so far in training camp. Larry Black and Ross LaKendrick have mixed in at times with him. Thompson's name has been called often during camp, and typically for positive reasons.


Vontaze Burfict: He's still Vontaze Burfict. There's not much else to add, other than the fact he's already in midseason form with his trash-talking and physical style of practice play.

Jayson DiManche: He's been similarly vocal and energetic as he tries hard to earn a roster spot. Like his rookie training camp, DiManche has quite the fight on his hands this year, having to fend off a number of linebackers.

Emmanuel Lamur: It seems clear the Bengals will benefit from having Lamur healthy this year. Primarily a coverage linebacker, he will regularly line up against tight ends and some receivers. With the high number of good tight ends the Bengals will face his year, his return comes at a good time.


The 'Older' Corners: There are too many of them to list individually, so we're going to group the Bengals' veterans together here. Terence Newman and Adam Jones have been particularly impressive, breaking up a number of difficult passes through the first few days. Along with Burfict, they've been the biggest defensive playmakers of the camp. Leon Hall hasn't done much from a gameplay standpoint so far, but he is noteworthy because of his slow and steady return after his Achilles tear last year.

Darqueze Dennard: Cincinnati's first-round draft pick has filled in admirably for whichever of the older corners takes days off while he practices. Since the Bengals have tried taking things slow with Newman, Jones and Hall, Dennard has found himself playing a number of cornerback positions to account for their absences. His best play defensively has come the past two days as the Bengals' schedule has afforded him more chances to showcase his patented lockdown man-press ability. He's looked more comfortable in that regard, defensive coordinator Paul Guenther said. Dennard also has been part of a variety of special teams units, using his speed on kickoff coverage and his cover skills to hold gunners in check on punt returns.


Reggie Nelson: The veteran safety hasn't been too flashy this camp, but he's had a solid enough work on the back end.