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First FSU scrimmage leaves Fisher upbeat

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- When Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher was asked who stood out to him during the team's first preseason scrimmage, he listed nearly one-fifth of his roster, 15 names and an entire position group total.

It's quite the stark contrast from how Fisher felt at the end of March following the first scrimmage of the spring, when the fifth-year coach, sounding like a let-down parent, expressed no anger but disappointment in the Seminoles' effort.

"Our kids know how to work. We know how to do things and what's expected," Fisher said Tuesday. "They know what's tolerated and not tolerated, and we're doing a very good job of staying above that line."

Fisher said Florida State, ranked No. 1 in the USA Today Coaches Poll, covered "everything from A to Z" in practice -- which was the longest of camp thus far -- mixing in full drives with the first-team offense playing against the first-team defense and working on situation football -- third downs, red zone and short-yardage to name a few examples.

The practice's physicality, a topic covered at length the last few days in the wake of Jalen Ramsey's dismissal from practice Sunday, was where Fisher wanted it to be. While a few healthy players wore the blue non-contact jersey, the rest of the team was in pads and hitting full speed.

"There were some good licks," said Fisher, who added Ramsey had one of his best practices for a second straight day.

A handful of projected starters did not participate -- Ukeme Eligwe, Ronald Darby and P.J. Williams to name a few -- the coaching staff learned enough about the Seminoles on Tuesday to see evidence that the 2014 team's identity is forming. Florida State has a starting lineup that could be the best in the country, but the team's depth was on display through much of the scrimmage. The freshmen have received rave review throughout camp, and Fisher once again was pleased with how his young players performed.

"You can visualize who can begin to help you, and the next three or four days will be interesting to see how they recover and how they play after this scrimmage," Fisher said.

The defense is in the midst of replacing its leader at every level of the unit, and there were some mental miscues during the scrimmage. However, junior defensive lineman Mario Edwards Jr. said those were largely because the starting defense was not used to a high-intensity, 12-play drive. Through much of the everyday practices, Edwards said the defense usually is on the field for only a few snaps before rotating with the second team.

The positive for the defense is the veterans are jelling with the inexperienced underclassmen.

"I would say the chemistry of the defense," was the biggest difference between the first spring and summer scrimmage, Edwards said. "We know where to be. We still had mental busts and brain farts, but for the most part we know where to be."

Florida State has its first day off Wednesday, and Fisher can rest comfortably knowing the Seminoles have earned one.

"I'm pretty pleased where we're at," Fisher said. "We got a lot of work to do but I'm not disappointed at all. We know where we're going."