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Where 2015 Big 12 recruits hailed from

Altogether, the Big 12 signed 228 players Wednesday.

Where did those players come from? An examination of every class revealed the answer.

Not surprisingly, the state of Texas remains the backbone of Big 12 recruiting. Just over 50 percent of Big 12 signees came from the Lone Star State. But the data also showed that the Big 12 is expanding its recruiting footprint into other states.

Some more observations on the data:

  • Though it it continues to serve as the lifeblood of Big 12 programs, the competition for talent in Texas has intensified in recent years. Texas A&M, Alabama, UCLA, USC, Ole Miss, LSU and even Cal all swiped top-20 players from the state. Just five years ago, only a trio of top-20 Texas recruits bolted from the Big 12 (and one of those was to TCU). This year, 13 of the top 20 signed out of the Big 12.

  • Despite this trend, the majority of the Big 12 relied on Texas once again for the majority of its signing classes. Texans comprised at least 40 percent of the classes from Baylor, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas and Texas Tech.

  • The rate of Texans headed to the Big 12 is actually up 4 percent from last year. Every Big 12 school signed at least three Texans, except for West Virginia, which for the second straight year didn't sign a Texas high schooler. (QB Skylar Howard was a native of White Settlement, Texas, but signed with the Mountaineers out of Riverside Community College in California.)

  • With Texas recruiting becoming more competitive, several Big 12 schools have had success opening pipelines elsewhere, including in SEC country. Iowa State and Kansas State nabbed a combined eight players from Georgia. After landing three players from Blue Springs, Missouri, last year, K-State picked up another three recruits from the same school, Tucker (Ga.) High, including linebacker Elijah Sullivan, whom the Wildcats flipped from Auburn on signing day. Oklahoma State and TCU continued to make inroads into Louisiana, each landing three players from the Pelican State.

  • Texas ended up with a top-10 class, but the Longhorns ventured outside their home state. A third of the class came from outside Texas, as Charlie Strong used his connections to add five players from Florida.

  • Oklahoma signed recruits from all over the map, as well, including Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Virginia, California, Illinois and Canada.

  • West Virginia, once again, had to show the most creativity, given the lack of in-state talent and its distance from Texas. The Mountaineers raided the East Coast, from New Jersey to Miami. West Virginia also did well adding depth to its class from just west, with four Ohioans in the class.