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Nate Solder's extension with Patriots has unique elements for both sides

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -- Catching up on some details from the past week, let’s follow up on the breakdown of New England Patriots left tackle Nate Solder’s two-year contract extension with the club and why it’s unique from both sides:

Signing bonus: $12.5 million

2015

Base salary: $1.438 million (full guarantee)

Pro Bowl bonus: $500,000

Salary cap charge: $5.610 million

2016

Base salary: $6 million (full guarantee)

Roster bonus: $500,000 ($31,250 per game if on 46-man game-day roster)

Pro Bowl bonus: $500,000

Workout bonus: $31,000

Salary cap charge: $10.697 million

2017

Base salary: $6.5 million

Roster bonus: $500,000 ($31,250 per game if on 46-man game-day roster)

Pro Bowl bonus: $500,000

Workout bonus: $31,000

Salary cap charge: $11.187 million

Note: Team agrees not to use franchise or transition tag

QUICK-HIT THOUGHTS: Solder’s full guarantee is $20 million, which essentially means this deal sets him up for life. Almost every player wants to get to his second contract like this, because that is usually the one chance to cash in. At the same time, if Solder made it through this season healthy and wasn’t restricted by the franchise or transition tag, he likely would have received more on the open market next year. One example of the current left tackle market was reflected in the pact signed by Washington’s Trent Williams: five years, $66 million contract with $30 million guaranteed. These decisions for players are obviously personal and what’s important to each player will vary. If a player likes his situation, he might be more willing to cash in early, still be paid fairly, but potentially leave some money on the table. If a player is more interested in maxing out every last dollar, this deal might be viewed as a non-starter and the decision would be made to head to the market in 2016. Solder doesn’t strike me as a player who is driven by money, and this deal, while still generous, reflects that. By taking a shorter term, he lowers his full guarantee but also sets himself up to be a free agent again when he is 30 years old and could receive another big payday. As for the team, it creates $1.8 million in cap space this year and keeps a key player in place at fair but not break-the-bank price.