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Extension cements David Andrews as part of Patriots' future

Patriots center David Andrews can earn up to $4.5 million over the next two seasons, but to get that financial security he signed away the opportunity to hit unrestricted free agency after the 2018 season. Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -- The details of center David Andrews' three-year contract extension with the New England Patriots are in, so let's analyze it:

Signing bonus: $1.6 million

Total cash value: $9.615 million

Maximum value: $11.715 million

2017

Base salary: $615,000

Roster bonus: $300,000 ($18,750 per game on 46-man roster)

Salary-cap charge: $1.32 million

2018

Base salary: $900,000

Roster bonus: $400,000 ($25,000 per game on 46-man roster)

Not-likely-to-be-earned incentives: $700,000 (based on playing time)

Salary-cap charge: $1.7 million

2019

Base salary: $2 million

Roster bonus: $400,000 ($25,000 per game on 46-man roster)

Not-likely-to-be-earned incentives: $700,000 (based on playing time)

Salary-cap charge: $2.8 million

2020

Base salary: $3 million

Roster bonus: $400,000 ($25,000 per game on 46-man roster)

Not-likely-to-be-earned incentives: $700,000 (based on playing time)

Salary-cap charge: $3.8 million

Andrews, who entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent in 2015, was scheduled to earn $615,000 this season and then likely would have received a second-round restricted free-agent tender from the Patriots at about $3 million for 2018. So if he didn’t sign this extension, he had a higher odds to make about $3.5-3.6 million over the next two years before hitting unrestricted free agency.

This, of course, assumes good health and that the Patriots weren’t planning on moving on from him in 2018.

By agreeing to this extension, Andrews speeds up the payment cycle in receiving a $1.6 million signing bonus. In addition to his $615,000 base salary for 2017 and $300,000 in roster bonuses, he could earn up to $2.515 million this year.

Add in his $2 million in salary, roster bonuses and incentives for 2018, and he can now earn up to $4.515 over the next two seasons (higher than the $3.5-$3.6 million he would have likely received otherwise).

By gaining that immediate financial security and upside in 2017-2018, Andrews signed away the opportunity to hit unrestricted free agency after the 2018 season, where he potentially could have received richer wages in 2019 and 2020.

If that was his primary goal, this deal could be viewed unfavorably. But if Andrews is happy in New England and wants to be part of the team’s future, I view this as a smart move by him. He knows there are only 32 starting jobs, his skill set is a good match for New England (but not all teams), and the organization easily could have looked to other options if it couldn’t lock in Andrews as part of its future plans.

Considering Andrews' signing bonus was $15,000 when he first joined the Patriots, and that simply making the roster wasn't close to a guarantee, it makes sense why he would value the immediate financial and job security.