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Top 10 trades in Knicks history

When Carmelo Anthony was shipped to New York, it got us thinking, What were the previous top 10 trades in Knicks history based on how those new players performed and contributed to the team? Here's what we came up with (from 10 to 1):

10. On June 25, 1998, Marcus Camby was traded by the Toronto Raptors to the Knicks for Sean Marks, Charles Oakley and cash. Camby served as Patrick Ewing's backup in his first season with the Knicks -- technically half a season because of the lockout -- and did a solid job, averaging 7.2 points, 5.5 rebounds and 1.6 blocks to help lead them to the 1999 Finals. Camby went on to become one of the league's best defensive big men with the Knicks, averaging 11.1 points, 10.0 rebounds and 2.0 blocks in the next three seasons.

9. On Dec. 12, 1956, Willie Naulls was traded by the St. Louis Hawks to the Knicks for Slater Martin. Starting with his first full season with the Knicks in 1957-58, Naulls played in four straight All-Star Games. Naulls spent six seasons with the Knicks (when you add up two abbreviated seasons due to trades), averaging 19.3 points and 11.7 rebounds, and leading them to the 2009 Lost Eastern Division Semifinals.

8. On Dec. 9, 1976, Bob McAdoo was traded by the Buffalo Braves with Tom McMillen to the Knicks for John Gianelli and cash. McAdoo only played two 1/3 seasons with the Knicks, but during that time he averaged 26.7 points and 12.0 rebounds, and led them to the 1978 Eastern Conference Semifinals.

7. On Oct. 22, 1982, Bernard King was traded by the Golden State Warriors to the Knicks for Micheal Ray Richardson and a 1984 fifth-round draft pick (Scott McCollum). King may have averaged about the same amount of points as McAdoo (26.5 versus 26.7 in four seasons with the Knicks), but he led the team to two playoff appearances in 1983 and '84. As a member of the Knicks, King played in two All-Star Games (1984 and '85) and he led the league in scoring during the 1984-85 season at 32.9 points per game.

6. On July 14, 1996, Larry Johnson was traded by the Charlotte Hornets to the Knicks for Brad Lohaus and Anthony Mason. Every season Johnson played with the Knicks, the team made the playoffs, including a 1999 Finals appearance. He spent five seasons with the Knicks, averaging 12.3 points and 5.5 rebounds.

5. On Jan. 21, 1999, Latrell Sprewell was traded by the Golden State Warriors to the Knicks for Terry Cummings, Chris Mills and John Starks. Sprewell helped the Knicks reach the 1999 Finals in only his first season, and then the playoffs the following two years. He spent four 2/3 seasons with the Knicks, averaging 17.9 points and playing in the 2001 All-Star Game.

4. On June 27, 1988, Charles Oakley was traded by the Chicago Bulls with a 1988 first-round draft pick (Rod Strickland) and a 1988 third-round draft pick (Phil Stinnie) to the Knicks for Bill Cartwright, a 1988 first-round draft pick (Will Perdue) and a 1988 third-round draft pick (Derrick Lewis). Oakley was the Knicks' glue guy for 10 seasons from 1988-89 to 1997-98 -- and every one included a playoff berth. He averaged a double-double (10.4 points and 10.0 rebounds) and made one All-Star appearance in 1994.

3. On Oct. 14, 1965, Dick Barnett was traded by the Los Angeles Lakers to the Knicks for Bob Boozer. Except for his first season with the Knicks, Barnett led them to the playoffs for the rest of his eight-year tenure in New York, including two championships in 1970 and '73. He spent nine seasons with the Knicks, averaging 15.6 points and playing in the 1968 All-Star Game.

2. On Dec. 19, 1968, Dave DeBusschere was traded by the Detroit Pistons to the Knicks for Walt Bellamy and Howard Komives. Every season DeBusschere played with the Knicks, the team made the playoffs, including two championships in 1970 and '73. He spent five 2/3 seasons with the Knicks, averaging 16 points and 10.7 rebounds, and playing in five straight All-Star Games from 1970 to '74.

1. On Nov. 10, 1971, Earl Monroe was traded by the Baltimore Bullets to the Knicks for Mike Riordan, Dave Stallworth and cash. Monroe cemented his legacy as one of the greatest Knicks players by leading them to back-to-back Finals in 1972 and '73, including a championship in the second appearance. He spent nine seasons with the Knicks, averaging 16.2 points and playing in the 1975 and '77 All-Star Games.

Agree? Disagree? Chime in with your thoughts.

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