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Evaluating Kiffin-Saban after Week 1

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- Forget for a second that you ever watched Kiffin Cam. For that matter, forget that you followed the saga of Lane Kiffin’s hiring at Alabama all offseason. Forget all the talk about his pearly white visor, his new ideas and his colorful history. Forget that he and Nick Saban do indeed represent college football's odd couple.

Take a second to wipe that from your memory, and then think back to the game we saw last Saturday in Atlanta. Think about the way Alabama’s offense looked: how the line played, how the running backs carried the football, how the quarterback managed the pocket. Remember the actual plays and let the melodrama fall by the wayside.

Do that and you’ll be left with something oddly familiar: Alabama football. Saban’s brand of ball-control, pro-style offense didn’t change much with Kiffin calling the plays. It was still a matter of running to set up the pass. In fact, it was still a matter of running between the tackles. As Saban said after the game, "We’re one of the few teams in the world that still plays regular people."

"You know what 'regular people' means?" he asked. “A tight end, two backs and two wideouts. When I played, that was like getting in empty. Now we’re like the dinosaur age when it comes to that."

Despite all the speculation otherwise, Kiffin hasn’t single-handedly brought Alabama’s offense into the 21st century. Instead, he’s done exactly what he was asked to do: Keep what existed and make it better. It’s what Kiffin said he would do, remember? During his only media obligation this year, he said, "The last thing we would want to do is come in here and change a bunch of stuff."

Kiffin didn’t go entirely unnoticed on Saturday, though. His effect just wasn’t on the nuts-and-bolts of the offense. If he had gone exclusively to four-receiver sets or went no-huddle for more than series or two, maybe then we would have seen sparks fly on the sideline between he and Saban. But he didn’t, and Kiffin Cam yielded very little in the way of drama.

Instead, Kiffin worked the sideline quite effectively, huddling up with quarterback Blake Sims between series and during timeouts. If there was a check at the line, Kiffin whistled to Sims on the field and signaled the change. And judging by Sims’ final stats -- 24 of 33 for 250 yards and one interception -- it worked out well. Alabama racked up 33 points and 528 yards of offense, won the time of possession battle handily and was balanced with two 100-yard rushers.

"If he wasn't on the sidelines, we would have had a lot more issues, maybe more issues than we could overcome to be successful in the game," Saban said on Monday. "He did a really good job of managing Blake and helped him manage the game as much as you could ever do it."

Kiffin clearly passed his first test as Alabama’s offensive coordinator, but many more remain. Saban wants competition between Sims and Jake Coker at quarterback, injuries are bound to happen, and in some games either the run or the pass won’t come so easily. Adjustments will have to be made.

For now, though, the Kiffin/Saban drama has been much adieu about nothing.

Forget all the offseason talk and speculation, if you wish, but remember that we've got a long way to go before the whole story has played out.