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Florida-Georgia rivalry hot, SEC coaching deans not

Posted by ESPN.com's Chris Low

The races in both the Eastern and Western Divisions are certainly heating up, although Alabama now has a two-game cushion in the West. And the coaching seats of Tennessee's Phillip Fulmer and Auburn's Tommy Tuberville are getting hotter by the week. Let's take a look at what else and who else are hot and not in our weekly rundown of the league:

En Fuego
The Florida-Georgia rivalry: When's the last time this rivalry has been this hot? It's off-the-charts hot and not just because of the Bulldogs' end zone celebration last season. That's going to get a lot of play this week even if neither side is talking about it publicly. But the stakes in this game are much higher than revenge. Both teams are ranked in the Top 10, the first time that's happened since 1999. More importantly, the winner takes a commanding lead in the East race and stays in the running for a berth in the BCS National Championship Game. This rivalry has always been one of the most colorful rivalries in the South with the uniqueness of the neutral site, all the festive tailgating (We won't use the forbidden nickname for the game) and the fact that the two sides really don't care for each other. But this year, it means so much more than anything going on around the game.

Hot
Georgia running back Knowshon Moreno:
The Bulldogs' sensational tailback has been hot for three straight weeks now. He torched the LSU defense for 168 yards rushing last week, including a 68-yard touchdown run. There's not a player in the league that's more exciting to watch.

Not
LSU's defense:
What a difference a year makes. Simply, the Tigers are underachieving on defense. They've played two legitimate offensive teams this season and given up a total of 82 defensive points in those games. Where have you gone Glenn Dorsey?

Hot
Arkansas tight end D.J. Williams:
One of the best athletes in the league nobody has heard of, Williams set a school-record for most catches by a tight end with 10 catches for 129 yards in the loss to Ole Miss.

Not
Tennessee's discipline:
On two different occasions in the loss to Alabama, Tennessee had just 10 men on the field. One of the times cost the Vols a key first down in the first half when they were penalized for illegal formation.

Hot
Florida's offense:
Remember when all the Florida fans were wondering what was wrong with the Gators' offense? The only thing wrong now is scoreboard operators keeping up with how fast they score. The emergence of freshman running back Jeffrey Demps has made a huge difference.

Not
Arkansas fans:
Hey, nobody expected any roses for Houston Nutt's return, but how is a guy who had the kind of success he had in the Ozarks and did it the right way so reviled? Granted, Nutt wasn't perfect, but he's not an outlaw, either.

Hot
Georgia offensive line coach Stacy Searels:
He's done a masterful job with the Bulldogs' offensive line under trying circumstances. Getting it done up front in this league with three freshmen is miraculous enough, but juggling all the different combinations has made it all the more amazing. That said, Stacy, can I get an interview?

Not
Kentucky's special teams:
You have to try pretty hard to get three kicks blocked in one game. But the Wildcats managed to do it in one half in their 63-5 loss to Florida. Talk about a complete breakdown of the kicking game.

Ice, Ice Baby
Coaching deans of the SEC:
When you combine their coaching tenures, Tennessee's Phillip Fulmer and Auburn's Tommy Tuberville have coached in this league for 30 seasons and done it successfully and with class. Fulmer is in his 16th full season at his alma mater. Tuberville is in his 10th season at Auburn. He also coached for four seasons at Ole Miss before landing in the Plains. But in a sobering reminder of how this league chews up and spits out coaches, both men are now fighting for their coaching lives. There's a chance that neither will finish with a winning season, and if that's the case, it's unlikely that either will be back next season ... hard as that is to believe.