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2006 Draft Profile: Thabo Sefolosha

A few weeks ago, Chad Ford wrote this about Thabo Sefolosha:

He shot the ball very well from mid-range all the way out to the NBA 3-point line. He was a little streaky at times with the long ball, but that's to be expected considering he started shooting from that far away only two days ago.

He's a very smooth player with an excellent handle and good court vision. He flies up and down the floor, uses his feet well and can really defend.

"I think the kid has the potential to be a Boris Diaw-type player down the road," one NBA international scout told me. "He's really got all the tools. He's not a huge scorer, but all the little things he does don't show up on the boxscore."

In a TrueHoop MP3, Jonathan Givony of Draft Express says the only thing keeping Sefolosha from being a very high pick is the fact that he grew up in Switzerland, where there isn't an established pipeline of elite basketball development. He has been underexposed.

In another TrueHoop MP3, David Thorpe talks about a player with the potential to be a difference maker.

Here's a little video clip of a nice dunk, that at least shows how long those arms are.

He has a great life story. Several years ago, Romano Petitti of ULEBcup.com wrote a profile.

The story starts with his his mother, Christine, born in Montreaux, on the banks of Leman Lake, home of the famous summer jazz festival. Her grandmother was both a poet and a musician, and young Christine started drawing and painting early. She moved to South Africa for her first marriage and, after being in Johannesburg seven years, divorced and married a black South African musician. Patrick Sefolosha, Thabo's father, then the lead singer of "The Malopoets", would later make an album for EMI, the world-famous recording company. The marriage took place in Lesotho, since interracial marriage was still forbidden in South Africa at that time. The couple moved to Kensington, the black section of Johannesburg, but after suffering continued pressure and harassment by police, the Sefosholos decided to move to Switzerland to live in Christine's childhood home. There, Thabo was born.

He shares a name with Thabo Mbeki, who succeeded Nelson Mandela as president of South Africa.