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Cletus Seldin tests positive for increased testosterone; June 15 fight off

Undefeated welterweight Cletus Seldin has tested positive for increased levels of testosterone, which has forced his June 15 fight to be canceled.

Star Boxing promoter Joe DeGuardia told ESPN that Seldin's 10-round fight with Mike Arnaoutis at the Paramount in Huntington, New York, is off and that he likely would postpone the entire card because Seldin, the popular Long Island attraction scheduled to box in the main event, was off the show.

Seldin (19-0, 16 KOs), 30, provided a urine sample on May 23 in Florida to the Las Vegas-based Voluntary Anti-Doping Association, which was overseeing drug testing, because Seldin is enrolled in the WBC's Clean Boxing Program. The sanctioning body's world titleholders and the fighters ranked in the top 15 of its divisional rankings must enroll in the Clean Boxing Program, which subjects them to random testing.

According to a letter from Dr. Margaret Goodman, the president of VADA, to the parties involved Wednesday -- a copy of which was obtained by ESPN -- Seldin's A sample was "analyzed for anabolic agents, diuretics, beta-2 agonists, metabolic modulators, GHRP, hormones and related substances" and there was an "atypical" finding.

His testosterone to epitestosterone ratio (T/E) was 21.02 to 1, which far exceeds the allowable threshold of 4 to 1 under World Anti-Doping Agency standards. By comparison, former two-time heavyweight world titleholder Shannon Briggs' recent random VADA test, which forced a June 3 title fight against Fres Oquendo to be canceled, showed he had a 7.89 to 1 T/E ratio.

Also, a second test supplemental carbon isotope ratio test was also performed on Seldin's sample, which resulted in an "adverse" finding that "indicates results are consistent with administration of a steroid."

That steroid is synthetic testosterone, which DeGuardia said Seldin indicated he had taken on the VADA paperwork he had to fill out at the time he was randomly tested.

Seldin has the right to ask for an analysis of his B sample at his expense, although he is unlikely to have it tested, because his team said he has received testosterone therapy.

"Cletus has had testosterone therapy," DeGuardia said. "It's not like he's trying to hide anything or gain an unfair advantage. He wrote it on the sheet when VADA came to test him."

DeGuardia said that Seldin's trainer knew about the therapy and called the New York State Athletic Commission in April to let it know that the fighter was under a doctor's care and receiving testosterone therapy.

"He called to ask what he should do, because he wanted to know if he could still take the treatments," DeGuardia said. "He didn't get an answer, so on April 27 Cletus stopped all treatments. He didn't take anymore as of April 27."

This is Seldin's second issue with testosterone. He was also tested by VADA as part of the WBC Clean Boxing Program on Feb. 1 in an out-of-competition test, which came back with a T/E ratio of 20.2 to 1. In addition, Seldin also tested positive for the banned anabolic steroid stanozolol in the same test.

On April 6, the WBC ruled that Seldin was suspended from participating in any WBC-sanctioned bouts for six months, or until Aug. 1, and that VADA would design a specific random testing protocol for Seldin at his own cost that would go on for one year. But the June 15 fight was not a WBC-sanctioned bout, meaning the suspension did impact it.