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Jermell or Jermall Charlo, who's the better twin? They are not interested in comparisons

Jermell Charlo and his brother Jermall Charlo have been compared to each other since birth, which is only natural given that they are identical twins who have each forged successful careers and earned reputations as being among the best boxers in the world.

For a time, they held junior middleweight world titles simultaneously, thus becoming the first twins in boxing history to hold belts at the same time. But while they love and support each other through thick and thin, each is his own man.

So while there may always be an element of sibling rivalry when it comes to what they can accomplish, they do take a page out of the book of retired heavyweight greats Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko, who spent years repeatedly saying that they would never fight each other.

"Me and my brother talk the talk and we walk the walk. From this point on in our careers, we're going full force and it's going to be nothing but knockouts." Jermell Charlo

Not only would the brothers never consider facing each other, Jermell doesn't even want to fight in the same weight class as Jermall, who gave up his junior middleweight world title to move up to middleweight in 2017, where he has won both of his fights by knockout, claimed an interim world title and positioned himself as one of unified champion Gennady Golovkin's mandatory challengers.

Jermell, meanwhile, is very content to remain at junior middleweight and keep on winning and knocking opponents out, as he has done in his three world title bouts -- an eighth-round KO of John Jackson to win a vacant belt, a sixth-round destruction of Charles Hatley in a mandatory fight 13 months ago and a shocking first-round annihilation of Erickson Lubin in October.

"I ain't moving up. I'll tell you all now," Jermell said this week. "I'm making weight. I'm hydrated. Yes, I'm all the way good. I love this (154-pound) weight division, especially because I'm separated from my brother. I don't want to be in the same weight division where it's almost looking like who's the better fighter? Who's the better twin?"

The 28-year-old brothers from Houston have proven to be very good, but, like it or not, there will be a new comparison for people to make.

In May 2016, Jermall won a competitive unanimous decision -- 116-112, 116-112 and 115-113 -- to retain his junior middleweight belt against former titleholder Austin Trout.

Two years later it is Jermell who will face the same opponent as he prepares to make his third title defense against Trout on June 9 (Showtime, 10 p.m. ET/PT) in the co-feature of the Leo Santa Cruz-Abner Mares featherweight world title rematch at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Naturally, Jermell, who shares trainer Derrick James with welterweight world titlist Errol Spence Jr., was asked about his interest in outdoing his brother against a common opponent. He said it is not something he concerns himself with.

"I ain't moving up. I'll tell you all now. I'm making weight. I'm hydrated. Yes, I'm all the way good. I love this (154-pound) weight division, especially because I'm separated from my brother. I don't want to be in the same weight division where it's almost looking like who's the better fighter? Who's the better twin?" Jermell Charlo

"It's always been something like that growing up, knowing I wanted to be the best. And my brother considers himself the best, I consider myself the best," Jermell said. "He fought Trout and I never fought anyone my brother has ever fought since we've become elite fighters. I can't go by what my brother thinks. He might think Trout is strong, I might think he's not strong.

"The only thing I do is I feel the emotion that he has and that's it. So what my brother done to Trout is back in the day. We've grown now in 2018. So there's no way I could say why my brother didn't get him out of there or why Trout didn't do the same or vice versa. I look at Trout like a world champion himself and I'm coming to take his title.

"My objective is to win Saturday night and then I can get out of the ring and have a great time with my brother."

Rather than be compared with his brother, Jermell (30-0, 15 KOs) would rather have people embrace both of them and enjoy the entertaining style and ferocity each brings to the ring.

"Me and my brother talk the talk and we walk the walk. From this point on in our careers, we're going full force and it's going to be nothing but knockouts," he said. "Our careers and our records are growing and you're getting to see more of the Charlos. We're jolts of lightning for this sport. We're giving people real problems. We just get in there and do what we do.

"We're ready to keep putting on shows for everyone. My brother just did his thing in Brooklyn (a second-round KO of Hugo Centeno Jr. to win a vacant interim middleweight title on April 21) and now we're taking it to the West Coast.

"It's (Trout's) job to beat me and I'm preparing to stop him. The 'Charlo Show' is going to keep going. I'm not worried about Trout's fight with my brother. Every fight we've been growing and changing. Me and my brother are a force to be reckoned with."

Trout (31-4, 17 KOs), 32, of Las Cruces, New Mexico, gave Jermall competition when they met and he has studied Jermell's videos. While Trout won't truly be able to compare them until after the upcoming bout, what's his take at the moment?

"They both have good jabs and a strong right hand," said Trout, who will go into the fight with Barry Hunter as his head trainer and having demoted Louie Burke to an assistant. "I [think] 'Mell has the better skill set. He's been a bit faster. The thing about 'Mell I see is he takes different approaches to different fights whereas 'Mall, he kind of comes about each fight the same way. I watched the fight of me and 'Mall all week to see what I can do better. Not necessarily to compare in any way. That's what we watch tape on 'Mell for."

Whether Jermell outperforms his brother against Trout or not, he expects to win and keep making his case that he is the best in a talent-rich division, which he can only do by eventually facing fellow titleholder Jarrett Hurd, who became the first man to stop Trout when he retained his belt for the first time against him via 10th-round knockout in October.

Charlo was ringside on April 7 in Las Vegas to watch as Hurd (22-0, 15 KOs) scored a 12th-round knockdown to seal a split-decision victory in a fight of the year candidate against Erislandy Lara as he unified a pair of junior middleweight titles. Afterward, there was much discussion about a unification fight between Hurd and Charlo. Both fighters are open to it and it should be a relatively easy fight to make as both are aligned with adviser Al Haymon and fighting on Showtime.

"I can take on any man in this division," said Charlo, though Trout is on his mind before any real conversation about a Hurd fight can take place.

"I've been in there with, to me, some top-tier guys, and so has Trout," Charlo said. "You can't take that away from him at all. He's fought all of the top guys, everybody. This ain't a rookie that I'm getting in the ring with. And so, my life is on the line just like his. So may the best man win."