Category archive: Virginia Cavaliers

UCLA FansAP Photo/Jason RedmondUCLA earned the No. 1 national seed in our first attempt at predicting the NCAA tournament.

Are you ready for some baseball? Division I college baseball gets under way at 10 a.m. ET on Friday with the first two games of the Big East-Big Ten Baseball Challenge. If everything goes according to plan, one of the final games of opening weekend will feature Florida International's Garrett Wittels attempting to break Robin Ventura's 58-game hitting streak on ESPNU/ESPN3.com (Sunday, 7:30 p.m. ET).

While the first pitch of the season has yet to be thrown, it's never too early to start looking forward to June and the first College World Series at TD Ameritrade Park. Defending champion South Carolina lost its top two starting pitchers from last year's squad but returns a talented offensive core and has one of the best bullpens in the country. Last year's CWS field included several programs on the upswing. Arizona State was the only team from the 2009 field to return to Omaha in 2010; this year, the Sun Devils could be the only team not to earn a return trip to Nebraska. The talent level isn't down in Tempe, but unless the NCAA sanctions are reversed, ASU is barred from the postseason.

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Trevor Bauer
AP Photo/Nati HarnikESPN Preseason All-American Trevor Bauer leads a talented Bruins staff.

The 2011 season will see another change that could have an even bigger effect than the CWS' move three miles up 13th Street. College baseball is changing the specifications for aluminum bats from measuring the ball exit speed (BESR) to the coefficient of restitution (BBCOR). Early indications from fall practices are that power numbers will be down -- a lot. Small ball could become an even bigger part of the college game, which would favor several West Coast teams in a year when that region already appears to be extremely strong. Combined with the flipped orientation from Rosenblatt Stadium to TD Ameritrade Park -- where the wind is more likely to blow in than out -- pitching and clutch hitting could share the spotlight in late June.

Predicting the field, and especially the teams with the best chances at reaching Omaha, is tricky in mid-February. Using the 2010 preseason coaches' poll, only three of the top eight teams earned national seeds, and just two finished their season at Rosenblatt. Eventual national champion South Carolina and runner-up UCLA both started just outside the Top 25. High early-season expectations are usually enough to get into the tournament, as only East Carolina and Ohio State failed to make the field after appearing in the preseason Top 25.

This is the first time I've attempted to pick the field before the season started. My results at the end of last season were good but not great, but in some cases I favor my bracket to the official NCAA field. I was within one seed on six of the eight national seeds, overseeding Virginia by three spots and picking South Carolina over Georgia Tech for the final top-eight spot (with the way things played out, that looks like a good decision). Of the 34 at-large bids, I had 32 in my final bracket, and the two I omitted topped my "first nine out" section. California was my first team out (and most egregious miss, since it was the No. 2 seed in Norman) but went 0-2; Louisiana-Lafayette was my second team out and went 1-2 in the Austin Regional. The two teams from my bracket that missed regional play were Kentucky and Florida Gulf Coast; Kentucky had a solid RPI but missed the SEC tournament, while FGCU won the Atlantic Sun regular-season title in its first year of tournament eligibility behind ace Chris Sale but fell in the conference tournament. Of the 16 regional sites, I got two exactly right (Atlanta and Norwich) and three of four teams for three more (Auburn, Gainesville, Louisville).

Now that I've dispensed with the caveats, here's my initial projection:

Los Angeles Regional
No. 1 UCLA
San Diego
UC Irvine
Army

   Conway Regional
   Coastal Carolina
   North Carolina
   Ole Miss
   Monmouth


Austin Regional
No. 8 Texas
Louisiana-Lafayette
Southern Miss
Wright State


   Houston Regional
   Rice
   LSU
   Texas State
   Dartmouth


Fullerton Regional
No. 5 Cal State Fullerton
California
San Diego State
South Dakota State


   Stanford Regional
   Stanford
   Fresno State
   UC Riverside
   Minnesota


Norman Regional
No. 4 Oklahoma
Arkansas
St. John's
Wichita State


   New Britain Regional
   Connecticut
   Washington State
   Auburn
   Stony Brook


Fort Worth Regional
No. 3 TCU
Texas A&M
Arizona
Jackson State


   Eugene Regional
   Oregon
   Georgia Tech
   Kansas State
   Rider


Nashville Regional
No. 6 Vanderbilt
Louisville
Nebraska
Kent State


   Clemson Regional
   Clemson
   Baylor
   Western Carolina
   Charlotte


Charlottesville Regional
No. 7 Virginia
East Carolina
Liberty
James Madison


   Columbia Regional
   South Carolina
   College of Charleston
   Oregon State
   Jacksonville State


Gainesville Regional
No. 2 Florida
Miami
Florida International
Florida Gulf Coast


   Tallahassee Regional
   Florida State
   Alabama
   Florida Atlantic
   Bethune-Cookman

Last five in: Florida International, Nebraska, Western Carolina, San Diego State, Liberty

First nine out: Kentucky, Elon, NC State, Pittsburgh, Tulane, Oklahoma State, Cal Poly, Southeastern Louisiana, USC

With the exception of Arizona State, which is banned from the postseason, all the teams that played in the final CWS in Rosenblatt earn regional hosting assignments and No. 1 seeds, with the top four national seeds all gunning for a return to Omaha. The other four national seeds all fell 2-1 in super regionals last year, so this bracket is biased toward last year's elite teams. The road from opening day to Selection Monday is bumpy enough that the final field probably won't look like this, but there's a lot of returning talent from last year, and the top squads have reloaded quickly.

Eleven of the 30 conferences with automatic bids send more than one team to a regional. The usual suspects lead the charge, with the SEC (eight), Pac-10 (seven), ACC (six) and Big 12 (six) each in the running to send at least a half-dozen teams to the postseason. The Big East and Sun Belt seem poised to send three teams to a regional for the second straight year, while Conference USA and the Big West should pick up a third bid after only nabbing two last season. For the three conferences slated for two bids, there's one clear leader and one bubble team: Coastal Carolina (Big South), TCU (Mountain West) and College of Charleston (Southern) should be locks to make the field, but Liberty, San Diego State and Western Carolina could be on the wrong side of the bubble if they don't secure automatic bids.

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Danny Hultzen
Darryl Dennis/Icon SMIDanny Hultzen and the Cavs are focused on getting to Omaha this season.

Connecticut has the talent to earn a national seed, but the Huskies are in uncharted territory. Last year's great northern hope was Ohio State, and the Buckeyes failed to qualify for the Big Ten tournament after starting the year in the Top 25. UConn needs to overcome a tough early-season trip to California and a bull's-eye on its back during Big East play; that will make the Huskies stronger for postseason play but could cost them some wins and a top spot.

The order of finish for the SEC is always tough to determine, especially considering how quickly a strong recruiting class can pay dividends. Odds are that the eight teams that reach the SEC tournament in Hoover, Ala., will still be playing in June, but at this point it's hard to count any of the 12 teams out. The top three teams coming into the season are all in the Eastern Division, and it's unlikely that three teams from the same division would all earn national seeds -- much like the early part of the season last year, South Carolina draws the short straw.

The top half of the ACC seems more clear-cut, with Virginia, Florida State and Clemson jockeying for a national seed. Danny Hultzen and six returning hitters give Virginia an early advantage, but the Seminoles and Tigers aren't far behind. At least one of those teams should earn a top-eight spot, with the other two battling for the final spot with the SEC third-place team, the Big 12 second-place team and Connecticut.

The biggest issues for the Pac-10 could be the depth of the conference and Arizona State's postseason ban. The Sun Devils should still pile up wins this year, and every conference win is a lost opportunity for the other Pac-10 schools. The conference won't match its eight bids from last season; seven bids seems most likely, but if ASU sweeps any of the middle-of-the-pack teams, six bids is a possibility.

Three and a half months of action on the field before the NCAA tournament field is announced. Let the games begin!

Jeremy Mills is a researcher for ESPN and is a contributor to ESPN.com's college baseball coverage.

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We're two-thirds of the way through the college baseball regular season, and this year has been crazier than ever. Outside the top 10, the disparity between rankings and RPI is quite extreme, and several schools with solid rankings are struggling in conference play. There are still six weeks left to play out the season, which is good -- at this point I wouldn't want to make any final decisions.

After struggling last year and receiving only three postseason bids, the Pac-10 is back in top form this year. Nine of the 10 schools are in position to make a run at the NCAA tournament, including Oregon in the second year since the program was reintroduced. The SEC is as strong as ever -- it's likely that all eight teams that make it to Hoover will play into June, and nine or 10 bids for the league aren't outside the realm of possibility.

If these two conferences eat up a quarter of the slots in the tournament, it's likely to come at the expense of the Big West and Conference USA. Both perennial power conferences are having down years, to the extent that each could be a one-bid league.

Outside the "Big Six" baseball conferences, the Sun Belt and Big East are having great years. Louisville has put itself into the running for a national seed, but is in a dogfight for the top spot in the Big East with Connecticut, Rutgers and Pittsburgh. The Sun Belt has passed both C-USA and the Big West in RPI, and could get as many as four invitations to the postseason.

For this initial projection, there are 12 conferences with more than one bid:
9 teams: SEC
7 teams: ACC, Pac-10
6 teams: Big 12
3 teams: Big East
2 teams: Big South, Big West, Conference USA, Mountain West, Southern, Southland, Sun Belt

Shaking out the top 16 teams from a list of 20 candidates proved harder than normal at this point, as this is where the disparity between conference standing, polls and RPI reared its head. There are seven teams in the SEC that could lay claim to No. 1 regional seeds, but based on past history that number is more likely to settle at four. There are also more teams than slots in the ACC, where five teams are vying for top slots. At this point, conference standings rule the day -- that leaves Clemson on the wrong side of the divide in the ACC, with Vanderbilt, Auburn and (especially) Alabama out in the SEC.

Eliminating those four teams from contention for a No. 1 seed leaves three spots open once you get past the "secure" teams from other conferences (Arizona State, Coastal Carolina, Louisville, Texas, UCLA). Cal State Fullerton and TCU claim two of those bids with their first-place conference standings and strong overall résumés. The overall strength of the conference nets the Pac-10 a third bid, with California edging out Arizona by winning the head-to-head series.

All but one of the No. 1 seeds will host a regional. The lack of lights at California is likely to force the NCAA to look elsewhere, so the excluded ACC and SEC schools come back into play. Clemson is unlikely to get the nod as a third host in South Carolina, while Alabama's low conference standing makes it an unlikely host. Vandy wins the race against Auburn based on higher standing in both the RPI and human polls.

Here's the breakdown by conference for the 16 host sites through April 19:
ACC (4): Florida State, Georgia Tech, Miami, Virginia
Big 12 (1): Texas
Big East (1): Louisville
Big South (1): Coastal Carolina
Big West (1): Cal State Fullerton
MWC (1): TCU
Pac-10 (2): Arizona State, UCLA
SEC (5): Arkansas, Florida, LSU, South Carolina, Vanderbilt

It's time to unveil the 16 regionals. National seeds are listed, and the regional following the national seed is paired against it in the super regionals.

Tempe Regional
No. 1 Arizona State
Connecticut
New Mexico
Maine
Louisville Regional
Louisville
Western Kentucky
Kentucky
Wright State
Fayetteville Regional
No. 2 Arkansas
Kansas State
Ohio State
Wichita State
Tallahassee Regional
Florida State
Auburn
Texas Tech
Marist
Austin Regional
No. 3 Texas
Rice
Texas State
Texas Southern
Fort Worth Regional
TCU
Oklahoma
Ole Miss
Oral Roberts
Atlanta Regional
No. 4 Georgia Tech
Oregon
Alabama
Jacksonville State
Gainesville Regional
Florida
Virginia Tech
East Carolina
Bethune-Cookman
Baton Rouge Regional
No. 5 LSU
Southeastern Louisiana
Texas A&M
Wagner
Coral Gables Regional
Miami
Florida Atlantic
Oregon State
Florida Gulf Coast
Charlottesville Regional
No. 6 Virginia
Stanford
Liberty
James Madison
Nashville Regional
California
Vanderbilt
Kansas
Dartmouth
Conway Regional
No. 7 Coastal Carolina
Clemson
College of Charleston
Central Michigan
Columbia Regional
South Carolina
The Citadel
North Carolina
Charlotte
Los Angeles Regional
No. 8 UCLA
San Diego
UC Irvine
Fresno State
Fullerton Regional
Cal State Fullerton
Arizona
Rutgers
Army

Last five in: UC Irvine, Kentucky, Ole Miss, College of Charleston, North Carolina

First nine out: VMI, Georgia Southern, Louisiana-Lafayette, Michigan, Baylor, Boston College, Pittsburgh, Mississippi State, Tulane

Louisville fans have a legitimate gripe with this bracket. The Cardinals were under consideration for a national seed, losing out narrowly to Coastal Carolina and UCLA. The NCAA doesn't seed the other eight No. 1 seeds, and most of the other regionals paired off well geographically, so Louisville draws the short straw and is paired up with Arizona State. If Louisville captures the Big East crown (and especially if UCLA continues to struggle in conference play), the Cardinals can lay claim to a national seed and force the committee to pair someone else with the Sun Devils.

UC Irvine narrowly makes the field, sparing the Big West from earning just one bid in 2010. East Carolina also falls on the right side of the bubble to join first-place Rice from Conference USA.

Three SEC teams sit squarely on the bubble, with one or two bids at stake. Until the conference race plays out, Kentucky and Ole Miss look like better bets to make the field than Mississippi State.

VMI (Big South), Georgia Southern (SoCon) and Louisiana-Lafayette (Sun Belt) narrowly miss earning a third bid for their respective conferences. Their fate likely rests in the hands of regular-season champions from one-bid leagues winning their conference tournaments.

And the very last team in the field is North Carolina. The Tar Heels have ended their season in Omaha each of the past four years, but a 6-12 start to ACC play (and a tough finishing schedule) puts the team in a perilous position. The pollsters and RPI still like the Heels, so for now UNC gets the final invite.

That does it for this week's aluminum-bat version of bracketology. This will be a weekly feature heading up to the selection show on Memorial Day, and your comments are welcome.

Jeremy Mills is a researcher for ESPN and is a contributor to ESPN.com's college baseball coverage.

Razorbacks edge Cavaliers in 12 innings

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
10:52
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- Arkansas will get a chance to avenge its College World Series loss to LSU.

Thanks to a 4-3 win over Virginia in 12 innings Wednesday night at Rosenblatt Stadium, the Hogs move on to the Bracket One championship on Friday against the unbeaten Tigers (2 p.m. ET, ESPN2HD). But for Arkansas to advance to next week's CWS Championship Series, it will need to beat LSU on Friday and Saturday in this double-elimination format. The Tigers beat the Hogs 9-1 on Monday.

The game winner against the Cavs came on a double to left by Andrew Darr that scored Jarrod McKinney from second base. It was a 10-pitch at-bat for Darr against UVa reliever Andrew Carraway.

Virginia had led for most of the game, taking a 2-0 lead in the fifth before the Hogs trimmed that in half with a run in the seventh. The Cavs added an insurance run in the bottom of the eighth with two outs when Dan Grovatt sent a 0-1 pitch from reliever Mike Bolsinger over the wall in left center field for a 3-1 lead. But Arkansas' Brett Eibner mashed a 1-1 offering from closer Kevin Arico deep into the left-field stands for a two-run homer to tie the score at 3-3 after eight-and-a-half innings.

Virginia finished the 2009 season with a 49-15-1 record. And Arkansas (41-23) survived to play at least one more day.

Razorbacks get one back

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
9:43
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- The Razorbacks aren't going to go quietly.

Arkansas, which has 15 wins this season when tied or trailing in the seventh inning or later, got on the board in the seventh to cut Virginia's lead to 2-1.

Bo Bigham reached on an error by third baseman Steven Proscia. Then Zack Cox doubled to left to give Arkansas runners at second and third.

That signaled the end of the night for UVa starting pitcher Danny Hultzen, who was replaced by righty Tyler Wilson. A sac fly to center by Brett Eibner scored Bigham from third to give the Hogs their first run of the game.

Hultzen will stay in the game as the Cavs' DH, but his night on the mound ended with the following line: 6.1 IP, 5 H, 1 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 7 K on 96 pitches (64 strikes).

There might be just six outs to go in Arkansas' season as we head to the eighth inning, but Hultzen's being gone brings new life to the Hogs' bats, as the bullpens have been quite the adventure so far at The Blatt.

Cavs, Hogs head to extra innings

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
9:05
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- And we head to extra innings with the score tied 3-3 as Virginia couldn't plate a run in the bottom of the ninth inning.

Danny Hultzen grounded into an inning-ending 6-4-3 double play with the bases loaded just when it looked for sure as if the Hoos were going to rebound after surrendering a 3-1 lead in the top of the ninth.

Arkansas is 6-1 in extra-inning games this season, and UVa is 0-2.

Eibner's blast lifts Hogs into tie with Cavs

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
9:05
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- Not so fast, Virginia.

The Cavs were one out from a date with LSU on Friday for the Bracket One championship when Arkansas' Brett Eibner mashed a 1-1 offering from closer Kevin Arico deep into the left-field stands for a two-run homer to tie Wednesday's CWS elimination game at 3-3 after eight-and-a-half innings.

Virginia led the entire game until the ninth, taking a 2-0 lead in the fifth before the Hogs trimmed that in half with a run in the seventh. The Cavs added an insurance run in the bottom of the eighth with two outs when Dan Grovatt sent an 0-1 pitch from reliever Mike Bolsinger over the wall in left center field for a 3-1 lead.

UVa still has a last turn at bat to try to end this game without going to extra innings.

Cavaliers rally to take lead on the Hogs

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
8:30
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- Arkansas starter Drew Smyly may have been tiring a bit or the Virginia batters just figured him out by the middle of the game.

Either way, the scoreless tie was broken in the bottom of the fifth when UVa first baseman John Hicks hit a 1-0 offering from Smyly just over the fence in left field for a 1-0 lead. It was Hicks' eighth homer of the season.

On the live play, the ball came back into the field of play and Hicks ended up on second base with what appeared to be a double. But Virginia skipper Brian O'Connor sprinted out of the third base dugout to complain. It took a minute for the four umpires to confer but they changed the original call and got it right. The replay clearly showed that the ball went in and out of a fan's glove in the first row of the bleachers and back into the field of play.

UVa extended its lead to 2-0 four batters later when Danny Hultzen -- the starting pitcher who is batting second in the Cavs' lineup -- doubled to left with two outs and scored John Barr from third base.

That signaled the end of the night for Smyly (4.2 IP, 8 H, 2 ER, 0 BB, 7 K, 84 pitches), who was replaced by righty Mike Bolsinger.

Waiting for runs at Rosenblatt

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
6:39
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- We're halfway through this elimination game between Arkansas and Virginia and still waiting for the game's first run.

Virginia had a chance to break the scoreless tie in the bottom of the fourth. Phil Gosselin led off with a double deep to right and later advanced to third on a wild pitch to UVa starter Danny Hultzen. But a pair of strikeouts to end the inning left Gosselin stranded on third. The one to end the inning was the second of the game and the seventh of the CWS for center fielder Jarrett Parker, who is now 0-for-8 here in Omaha -- although he does have four walks.

The Hogs and the Hoos each have four hits and three left on base through 4½ innings at The Blatt.

A lot of attention is being paid to the local radar as several bands of thunderstorms have popped up in this part of the state. And there is a tornado watch -- not an uncommon thing on a hot summer night here in the heartland -- until 9 p.m. local time.

Hogs, Cavs scoreless through three innings

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
6:14
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- It's scoreless through three innings here in Game 9 of the 2009 College World Series. And it's starting to look like a good pitchers' duel between Arkansas' Drew Smyly and Virginia's Danny Hultzen.

Arkansas threatened in the top half of the third when James McCann led off with an infield single and then advanced to third on a pair of groundouts. But Ben Tschepikow couldn't pick up the RBI -- he went down swinging after starting out with a 3-0 count against Hultzen.

Hultzen's line through three innings: 2 H, 4 K on 44 pitches (30 strikes). Smyly has been equally effective in his three innings of work: 3 H, 5 K on 45 pitches (31 strikes). And each pitcher has faced 11 batters.

The Razorbacks and Cavaliers have each left two men on base so far.

Cavs, Razorbacks ready to rock Rosenblatt

June, 17, 2009
06/17/09
5:44
PM ET
OMAHA, Neb. -- The heat has made an appearance at Rosenblatt Stadium. And so has the wind.

It's 5 p.m. local time, and the temperature is still in the low 90s, and there's a stiff breeze out to left field. Not sure whether that means we're in for a long and high-scoring affair, but don't say you haven't been warned.

Tonight's game between Arkansas and Virginia is another elimination affair, with the winner advancing to Friday to face unbeaten LSU (2 p.m. ET, ESPN2HD) -- and the loser heading back home for the summer.

With the win-or-go-home stakes in play, Virginia coach Brian O'Connor is giving the ball to lefty ace Danny Hultzen (9-1, 2.33 ERA). He was the starter in Saturday's CWS opener against the Bayou Tigers, a 9-5 loss. Hultzen's no-decision line from that game: 3 IP, 7H, 3ER, 1 BB, 5 K. He will face Arkansas lefty Drew Smyly (3-1, 4.73 ERA), who has yet to appear in the CWS.

Here are tonight's starting lineups:

Arkansas (40-23):
LF Chase Leavitt
SS Ben Tschepikow
DH Scott Lyons
1B Andy Wilkins
2B Bo Bigham
3B Zack Cox
CF Brett Eibner
C James McCann
RF Jarrod McKinney

P Drew Smyly (3-1, 4.73)

Virginia (49-14-1):
SS Tyler Cannon
P Danny Hultzen (9-1, 2.33)
2B Phil Gosselin
RF Dan Grovatt
3B Steven Proscia
CF Jarrett Parker
1B John Hicks
C Franco Valdes
LF John Barr

Umpires:
HP Jeff Henrichs
1B Steve Manders
2B Darrin Sealey
3B Tony Maners

Weather:
Partly Cloudy
92 degrees
19 mph winds, out to left

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