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My Three Sons

SPECIAL TO ESPN.COM

Oct. 5, 2005

Texas Tech recently made a great decision by announcing that Pat Knight will take over the head-coaching reins from his father Bobby down the line. It is good to see that the name Knight will remain on the sidelines in Lubbock for many years.

Robert Montgomery Knight has created a lot of basketball excitement since taking over the Red Raiders. When the General decides to step aside, the transition will be smooth.

Pat Knight has an intense, competitive drive, knowledge of the sport, and an ability to communicate with today's modern athlete. He has a thirst and hunger to succeed, so you know some of his dad's mentality rubbed off on him.

There is an interesting trend of sons taking over for fathers in college basketball.

In the near future at Washington State, Tony Bennett will take over when his father Dick decides to step aside. The move to succeed his dad makes sense; the younger Bennett spent three seasons as an assistant at Wisconsin before joining the staff in Pullman. Tony Bennett helped guide the Badgers to the 2003 Sweet 16. He has also done a good job recruiting, helping secure Devin Harris in Madison.

Previously, it was announced that Sean Sutton would take over for his father Eddie at Oklahoma State when the elder Sutton retires.

These sons have learned about what the game is all about from the time they put on diapers. They have incredible desire and knowledge after being around their respective dads. That is a big plus and they are ready for the opportunity to build their own programs. Knight, Bennett and Sutton are great names to continue on. College hoop fans should be happy with this news.

Dick Vitale coached the Pistons and the University of Detroit before broadcasting ESPN's first college basketball game in 1979. Send a question for Vitale for possible use on ESPNEWS.

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