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The Greatest Night in Chicago

Relive Game 7 of the World Series through the eyes of the Cubs faithful who gathered near Wrigley Field, as captured by photographer Jon Lowenstein.

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or the people of Chicago, Game 7 of the 2016 World Series was the kind of event that brought their city together the way that only a sports team can.

It was a night that was glorious, exciting and filled with drama -- a night that will not be soon forgotten.

It was the kind of night that brings fans back home, the kind of night that can only happen once.

The Chicago Cubs beat the Cleveland Indians and broke a 108-year-old title drought -- the longest in American sports history -- and fans were on the street, pressed flesh to flesh, collectively displaying the heart and soul of Cubs Nation.

All along Clark Street and at bars such as Sluggers and John Barleycorn, fans waited a long time, often in the rain, and paid significant cover charges to watch the game from screens within. Others tried to catch a glimpse from the street through windows and doors.

These Cubs fans didn't get to watch the game in person, but their emotions were revealed in the gleaming eyes and shouts of each and every person standing around them. The highs and the lows of the evening were felt through the expressions of joy and anguish as the locals supported their Cubbies as close to their home at Wrigley Field as they could.

After 108 years of heartache, the skid finally came to an end in 10 innings in Cleveland.

Chicago Cubs fans had to wait a long time for their team's latest World Series championship -- and they also had to wait a long time outside the various bars and clubs that line Clark Start in the Wrigleyville neighborhood of Chicago to catch the action.

Cubs fans were at overflow capacity at The Bar Celona, as some watched the game from the sidewalk.

This man watched all of Game 7 through this small glass window in the doorway to John Barleycorn Memorial Pub.

This was the somewhat obstructed view from the front door window at John Barleycorn Memorial Pub.

A woman stood with her friends outside Roadhouse 66, a few blocks south of Wrigley Field. Clark Street establishments catered to the "Lovable Losers," as Cubs fans had been known for some time. They are losers no more.

Chicago Police held back the crowd until the middle of Game 7, but eventually, the numbers grew so large that officers allowed the thousands of faithful fans to stream north onto Clark Street.

As the Cubs saw their lead disappear after an Indians home run tied the game at six runs apiece in the bottom of the eighth inning, these concerned fans at John Barleycorn Memorial Pub thought "it" was happening again.

Cubs fans sneak a kiss at the John Barleycorn Memorial Pub.

As the Cubs' significant lead diminished, you could read what was happening on fans' faces in a packed bar.

Game 7 was an emotional rollercoaster for these Cubs fans who were watching the game at John Barleycorn Memorial Pub.

While some Chicagoans expected the fans to riot if the Cubs won the World Series, that was not the case. Pictured here is a rare incident of violence during Game 7: After requesting and being refused entry to a bar to use the restroom, a man became irate and bouncers took action.

Cubs fans celebrate their World Series championship on Clark Street in Wrigleyville.

After 108 years of waiting, the Cubbies' title was sweet for Cubs fans reveling on Clark Street in Wrigleyville.

The Cubs' victory was marked in many unique and compelling ways. This man took off his shirt -- and someone reached out and got a bit friendly.

At least four men climbed this tree to get a better view of the festivities and to celebrate the end of the longest championship drought in U.S. sports history.

Finally, the Chicago Cubs are champions. After 108 long years, fans had reason to celebrate, and they did in all different ways.

Chris Francois of Chicago said this was the greatest day of his life. He has been attending Cubs games at Wrigley Field since he was 4 years old. He broke down in the middle of Clark Street after the Cubs beat the Indians to claim the World Series title.

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