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Fantasy 30: Harvey's suspension, Swanson's slump and more

Dansby Swanson entered 2017 as a promising young member of the Braves' offense but has struggled to get on base so far this season. Brett Davis/USA TODAY Sports

Even when you're a fan of one specific Major League Baseball team, it can be difficult to keep track of all of the news that surrounds your favorite club on a daily basis.

However, when you're a fantasy baseball owner and you now have to multiply that effort by 30 in order to be as up to date as possible with each and every club, it's a fool's errand that borders on the impossible.

Fear not! We'll be here each and every Monday and Thursday to give you a snapshot of what's going on in the world of baseball, with one fantasy takeaway from each of the league's 30 teams. Think of it as your one-stop shop for the week ahead.

Here are the takeaways as we head into Week 6 of the 2017 season:

Arizona Diamondbacks: Chris Owings is in a bit of a slump, going just 2-for-11 over his last three games. However, a flu bug in the Arizona clubhouse is likely to blame for this brief valley in an otherwise promising season for Owings. The versatile player is batting .300 with five home runs, and the coaching staff believes the power surge is legitimate. "He's made little adjustments in his mechanics and his setup and stuff, but I think most of it is because he's healthy and he feels like he can just let it go," said hitting coach Dave Magadan.

Atlanta Braves: In 129 at-bats last season, Double-A call-up Dansby Swanson hit .302 with an .803 OPS. So far in 2017, however, the results have not been as promising. In his first 106 at-bats, the young shortstop is batting just .151 with a .439 OPS. However, the organization is nowhere close to sending him back to the minors for more seasoning. Braves hitting coach Kevin Seitzer thinks that Swanson will come around: "What he's doing for me is off the charts ... just the way he's handling things mentally, emotionally and mechanically."

Baltimore Orioles: Closer Zach Britton returned from the 10-day DL on Tuesday, only to head right back on the list on Saturday as his left forearm strain issue has clearly not resolved itself. Britton believes he simply pressed matters and returned too soon, "Thankfully, it's the same issue. It's going to heal; it's just a matter of time. I guess if there's any positive, that's it." Brad Brach, who had five saves during Britton's first absence, has already jumped back into the ninth-inning role with two saves against the White Sox over the weekend.

Boston Red Sox: A shoulder injury suffered this spring has kept Hanley Ramirez from playing the field. As a result, he has been used exclusively as the team's DH so far this season. However, with five of Boston's next eight games in National League parks, the time has come for Ramirez to try his hand once again at first base. Mitch Moreland is currently hitting a career-high .281, but manager John Farrell doesn't want to overwork him: "Mitch has done a great job. This is his first real opportunity of playing every day and he's done just that, played every day. But I think it's important we're able to pick spots to keep him as fresh as possible."

Chicago Cubs: In his past two starts, Brett Anderson has lasted only a combined 1⅔ innings, allowing 12 earned runs in two Cubs losses. So it's no shock to see the pitcher on the 10-day DL with a strained lower back. Manager Joe Maddon isn't sure if he wants to go with a four-man rotation or perhaps call up Eddie Butler from Triple-A: "We could do a lot of different things." However, with his bullpen being overworked of late -- especially after Sunday's 18-inning affair -- adding a few fresh arms might not be the worst idea.

Chicago White Sox: Yoan Moncada is batting .352 on the season and in the midst of an 11-for-22 homestand at Triple-A Charlotte. Meanwhile the White Sox are hitting just .238 on the season, with a quartet of third basemen batting a combined .198. Could Moncada's arrival be on the horizon? General manager Rick Hahn won't tip his hand just yet: "His development is by no means complete at the minor league level, but he certainly is making a great deal of progress and we're thrilled with where he's at." However, at this rate, it would be a big surprise not to see Moncada in Chicago before the end of the month, perhaps even as early as next week.

Cincinnati Reds: Amir Garrett has pitched very well this season. In fact, give him a mulligan for his one disastrous outing against Milwaukee (9 ER, 3⅓ IP) and he's 3-1 with a 2.20 ERA. However, in today's world of innings caps and teams being extremely cautious with young pitchers, the Reds have opted to send Garrett to Triple-A Louisville. The plan is to have him throw maybe an inning or two in relief over the next week-plus and then get him back in the Cincinnati rotation. "Amir knows that he'll be back," manager Bryan Price said. "I'm sure he's not happy about it, but it will be part of the process."

Cleveland Indians: After a rough outing on May 2, where he allowed five earned runs in three innings, Corey Kluber was placed on the 10-day DL with a strained lower back. Manager Terry Francona doesn't think there's any real cause for alarm with his ace: "The hope is that after a couple days, he feels better and he can get back into getting on his program." In the meantime, Mike Clevinger has taken over Kluber's spot in the rotation. So far, so good, after 5⅔ shutout innings and a win over the Royals on Sunday.

Colorado Rockies: Mark Reynolds is batting .444 (8-for-18) in May, with home runs in three consecutive games. Reynolds took over the every-day first-base job when Ian Desmond started the season on the disabled list. Now that Desmond is back, Reynolds seems even more motivated to keep the job. "I want to keep playing," Reynolds said. "If you want to play, you have to produce -- especially in my situation." Desmond, meanwhile, spent the weekend in left field, batting 1-for-12 in the process.

Detroit Tigers: Francisco Rodriguez faced nine batters over the weekend. Five of them scored. After a pair of blown saves that ran K-Rod's record to 1-4 this season, Detroit may be ready to make a change at closer. "We're going to have to have a discussion," manager Brad Ausmus said Sunday. Justin Wilson, with eight holds as the eighth-inning reliever, would be the likeliest candidate to take over for Rodriguez if a move is indeed made.

Houston Astros: Jake Marisnick may be getting a few more starts in left field for Houston -- instead of Norichika Aoki -- but it has little to do with the handedness of the pitcher on the mound. Manager A.J. Hinch wants to use the speedy Marisnick when the team plays in Anaheim, Texas and in the Bronx (where the Astros will be starting Thursday) due to the size of left field in those stadiums: "I just want us to cover the most ground. Jake's got some of the best range on our team, so I like the configuration."

Kansas City Royals: Right-fielder Jorge Soler went 0-for-6 (3 K's) over the weekend, after being activated from the 10-day DL on Saturday. However, despite his being in a 2-for-19 (9 strikeouts) slump, the Royals decided to also keep outfielder Jorge Bonifacio on the roster instead of shipping him out to Triple-A. Manager Ned Yost says he will "mix and match" Soler, Bonifacio and DH Brandon Moss: "[Bonifacio] has been doing so well up here ... There's spots we can still move him in."

Los Angeles Angels: Mike Trout missed three out of four games to close out last week due to tightness in his left hamstring. Trout says the injury is nothing serious, but taking a few days off as a precaution is the best way to make sure it doesn't become something to truly worry about: "Have to be smart about it. I figure we take [two days off] and see how it feels in Oakland ... I'm going to come to the field tomorrow ready to play and see how it feels."

Los Angeles Dodgers: With the return to action of both Franklin Gutierrez and Joc Pederson, it was thought that Cody Bellinger would go back to Triple-A. However, the Dodgers opted against that decision -- and it's already paying dividends. Not only did hit a grand slam on Saturday and increase his batting average to .357, but Gutierrez had to leave that game with hamstring tightness. Although manager Dave Roberts doesn't think Gutierrez will have to return to the DL just yet, it would have been a real shame had they indeed sent Bellinger down only to suddenly have a need to recall him just a few days later.

Miami Marlins: Martin Prado has been strong in May, hitting .310 in 29 at-bats, but he came up lame on the basepaths on Sunday. Now, Prado could be headed back to the 10-day DL with a strained right hamstring if a scheduled MRI early this week does not come out in his favor. Third baseman Miguel Rojas also had to leave Sunday's game with a bruised right thumb that swelled up on him. Derek Dietrich might have to man the hot corner for a few games, though Miami is also likely to recall J.T. Riddle from Triple-A.

Milwaukee Brewers: Eric Thames had been in a power outage over his last nine games entering Sunday, with a .176 batting average, 10 K's and a sad .206 slugging percentage. However, a 3-for-4 Sunday that included his 12th home run of the season seems to have quelled fears that Thames would be a one-month wonder. Thames blamed a good part of his recent slide on the weather: "It was freezing the last three games. We had delays, and timing was off, routine was off, so this felt good for the whole team." Here's to sunny skies!

Minnesota Twins: Brian Dozier is hoping to return to action Tuesday, after missing two games this weekend due to a sprained left ankle. Dozier had both an X-ray and an ultrasound performed, and no structural damage was found. "Today was a big day, knowing there's no real damage. There's peace of mind. We just have to get this swelling out of there and we're good," Dozier said. The Minnesota second baseman has struggled this season, with a career-low .229 batting average, though he does have four homers.

New York Mets: Matt Harvey was supposed to pitch for the Mets on Sunday, but shortly before the game started, GM Sandy Alderson announced the pitcher was suspended by the team for three games due to a violation of team rules. Harvey's erratic performance on the mound this season (5.14 ERA) has already begun to fuel trade rumors, and this latest disciplinary action will likely add more kindling to the fire. Harvey should be back with the team on Wednesday.

New York Yankees: New York continues its National League road trip at the start of the week, with two games in Cincinnati. Matt Holliday, the team's usual DH, did start at first base on Sunday, going 2-for-4, so there's a chance he may well see another start at the position before returning to DH when the team returns home Thursday. For what it's worth, Holliday is a .309 lifetime hitter in Cincinnati.

Oakland Athletics: Sean Manaea appeared to be turning things around when he suffered some shoulder tightness on April 26 that sent him to the 10-day DL. The A's have decided to give him a rehab appearance on Tuesday at Triple-A Nashville. Assuming all goes well in the outing, Manaea should return to the Oakland rotation the next time his turn comes around.

Philadelphia Phillies: It's easy to overlook what Cameron Rupp has been doing at the plate, considering the Phillies have gone just 1-6 in his past seven starts. That said, the catcher is batting .385 with two home runs in his past 26 at-bats, raising his average 77 points in the process. Rupp explains his recent surge: "I'm being selective and I haven't missed my pitch. I'm not fouling them off like I was the first few weeks. I'm making good contact ... And now that I'm swinging the bat well, I'm gaining confidence and will continue to go."

Pittsburgh Pirates: After posting a 2.08 ERA in April, Jameson Taillon's first May outing last Wednesday was a clunker. He allowed six runs in five innings and was subsequently placed on the 10-day DL with a groin injury. "We'll have more information later in the week when our doctors continue to evaluate him," manager Clint Hurdle said. Trevor Williams will get a chance to fill in for Taillon Monday night and, if he does well, could get a second start before Taillon is ready to return.

St. Louis Cardinals: Baseball America wrote the following about Magneuris Sierra, an outfielder in A-ball, in their 2017 Prospect Handbook; "Sierra is a superior defensive center fielder with an easy gallop and wide-open range." It was that defensive prowess that impressed the Cardinals enough to promote him straight to the majors to replace the injured Jose Martinez. Sierra went 1-for-6 with his first major league hit in his Sunday debut and made an impressive catch in the gap. Manager Mike Matheny heaped praise on the 21-year-old, "There are certain players who can play up to the competition. That's not unheard of. I just kept telling [coaches], 'Watch him. This guy looks like he belongs.'"

San Diego Padres: Since April 26, Ryan Schimpf has hit five home runs. Take those at-bats out of the mix and the Padres third baseman is just 3-for-26 (.115) with 11 K's over those 10 games. Sure, a pinch-hit home run against Clayton Kershaw on Saturday shows how dangerous his bat can be. That said, a 32.1 percent strikeout rate and a .125 BABIP is pretty much fantasy league poison, especially in points leagues.

San Francisco Giants: Brandon Crawford may or may not be heading to New York to join his Giants teammates this week. The shortstop, who has been on the shelf due to a groin injury since April 26, is going to Double-A Richmond for a rehab assignment on Monday. Crawford is hoping that it will only be a one-day detour: "If I feel fine one game, there's no reason to play another one."

Seattle Mariners: The Seattle rotation is in a bit of flux this week as Hisashi Iwakuma will be moved back to Thursday to give him a little more time to recover from a sore left knee -- the result of taking a liner off his leg during his last start. Chase De Jong will once again fill in for the injured Felix Hernandez on Friday. Saturday's pitcher could be either Dillon Overton or James Paxton, whose DL stint could be over in time for him to take the mound if the pitcher is over his forearm strain.

Tampa Bay Rays: Tim Beckham has played quite well at shortstop for the Rays this season, with hits in 12 of his past 15 games, for a .310 batting average and four home runs. Still, Matt Duffy -- who is recovering from heel surgery -- is ready to start running and may be very close to a rehab assignment in the minors. When he returns, Duffy is still expected to start at shortstop, so manager Kevin Cash may have to get creative with Beckham.

Texas Rangers: Tyson Ross pitched just once last season for the Padres, getting hurt on Opening Day and ultimately undergoing thoracic outlet surgery. Signed by the Rangers as a free agent, Ross is finally ready to take the mound on Monday, for two innings of a simulated game. If all goes well, a rehab assignment will follow. As for when he might join Texas' rotation, pitching coach Doug Brocail says, "For me, my question is, after the second or third start, can we build him up in the big leagues?"

Toronto Blue Jays: After 14 relief appearances this season, the Blue Jays turned to Joe Biagini to start Sunday's game on short notice. Both J.A. Happ (elbow) and Aaron Sanchez (fingernail) were unavailable and on the 10-day DL. Biagini impressed manager Joe Gibbons by lasting 52 pitches and four innings, allowing just one (unearned) run and two hits. "You know what, I thought he was dominating," Gibbons said. As such, Biagini is expected to get the call again, later this week against Seattle. Sanchez may be back as soon as Sunday.

Washington Nationals: Bryce Harper has scored seven runs in his past four games, but he hasn't been on the field since May 4 due to a groin injury. Dusty Baker said that Harper could have played over the weekend, but he decided to give his outfielder a little extra rest instead. Harper should be back Monday against the Orioles, so you should probably avoid being too concerned about the outfielder's health going forward, unless of course his name is once again missing from Dusty's lineup card.