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Carmelo Anthony: 'We have to step up and take charge'

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NBA's brightest stars advocating for change (1:55)

Rachel Nichols is proud of NBA stars like Carmelo Anthony for using their voice to try and make the country better. (1:55)

In the wake of the tragic shooting in Dallas that left five law enforcement officers dead, New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony took to social media Friday morning to ask athletes to "step up" and "demand change" without resorting to violence.

"Shooting 11 cops and killing 5 WILL NOT work," Anthony wrote on Instagram. "... I'm calling for all my fellow ATHLETES to step up and take charge. Go to your local officials, leaders, congressman, assemblymen/assemblywoman and demand change. There's NO more sitting back and being afraid of tackling and addressing political issues anymore. Those days are long gone. We have to step up and take charge.

"We can't worry about what endorsements we gonna lose or whose going to look at us crazy. I need your voices to be heard. We can demand change. We just have to be willing to. THE TIME IS NOW. IM all in. Take Charge. Take Action. DEMAND CHANGE."

First off let me start off by saying " All Praise Due To The Most High." Secondly, I'm all about rallying, protesting, fighting for OUR people. Look I'll even lead the charge, By Any Means Necessary. We have to be smart about what we are doing though. We need to steer our anger in the right direction. The system is Broken. Point blank period. It has been this way forever. Martin Luther King marched. Malcolm X rebelled. Muhammad Ali literally fought for US. Our anger should be towards the system. If the system doesn't change we will continue to turn on the TVs and see the same thing. We have to put the pressure on the people in charge in order to get this thing we call JUSTICE right. A march doesn't work. We tried that. I've tried that. A couple social media post/tweet doesn't work. We've all tried that. That didn't work. Shooting 11 cops and killing 5 WILL NOT work. While I don't have a solution, and I'm pretty sure a lot of people don't have a solution, we need to come together more than anything at this time. We need each other. These politicians have to step up and fight for change. I'm calling for all my fellow ATHLETES to step up and take charge. Go to your local officials, leaders, congressman, assemblymen/assemblywoman and demand change. There's NO more sitting back and being afraid of tackling and addressing political issues anymore. Those days are long gone. We have to step up and take charge. We can't worry about what endorsements we gonna lose or whose going to look at us crazy. I need your voices to be heard. We can demand change. We just have to be willing to. THE TIME IS NOW. IM all in. Take Charge. Take Action. DEMAND CHANGE. Peace7 #StayMe7o

A photo posted by @carmeloanthony on

LeBron James, who said Anthony's Instagram post was "on point," also reached out on Twitter to implore people to stop the violence.

In addition to the five officers who died, seven officers and two civilians were also injured Thursday night after an ambush in downtown Dallas following a peaceful march to protest the fatal shootings by police officers of two black men -- Alton Sterling in Louisiana and Philando Castile in Minnesota -- this week.

"Obviously, violence is not the answer of solving it," Serena Williams said Saturday after winning her seventh Wimbledon title in London. "The shooting in Dallas was very sad. No one deserves to lose their life, doesn't matter what color they are, where they're from.

"We're all human. We have to learn that we have to love one another. It's going to take a lot of education and a lot of work, I think, to get to that point. But I think, in general, the entire situation is extremely sad, especially for someone like me. It's something that is very painful to see happening."

Former Dallas Cowboys receiver and Pro Football Hall of Famer Michael Irvin, speaking to The Dallas Morning News at his football camp, said: "You can let it beat you, or you can rally together and say, 'Not on my watch.'

"And that's what the community in Dallas I'm sure will say, 'Not on my watch,' " Irvin said. "We will not allow this on our watch. We will rally together.'"

Irvin said football could help bridge the divide that permeates much of the nation.

"It gets rid of some of the issues we are dealing with," Irvin said. "With what happened here in Dallas and Minnesota and Louisiana. The game of football helps move past those things."

Texas Rangers outfielder Nomar Mazara reacted Friday to a photo posted on Instagram by teammate Joey Gallo that was taken a month ago with Dallas Police Department officer Patrick Zamarripa, who was identified as one of the officers who was killed Thursday night.

A couple months ago @nomazara26 and I were walking down the street in downtown Dallas. When an officer stopped us, Mazara and I immediately became nervous, "I know who you guys are" he said. "Joey Gallo and Nomar Mazara, can I get a picture with you guys please?" It was definitely a first for me and Nomar to have an officer, a true hero, want to meet us. His name is Patrick Zamarripa, one of the officers killed in last nights shootings in Dallas. I'll never forget how kind and down to Earth he was. We ended up having a 15 minute conversation about sports with him. He was an avid Rangers fan. But more importantly a great person, and family man. Please keep Patrick, and all the officers affected and their families in our prayers today. #prayfordallas

A photo posted by Joey Gallo (@joeygallo24) on

"Who would expect that you would take a picture with somebody a month ago and they'd be dead today," Mazara said. "He was a nice guy. He recognized us and we took a picture and talked baseball for about 15 minutes."

Dallas athletes also expressed their emotions on social media following Thursday night's attack.

"We need to steer our anger in the right direction," Anthony wrote. "The system is Broken. Point blank period. It has been this way forever. Martin Luther King marched. Malcolm X rebelled. Muhammad Ali literally fought for US. Our anger should be towards the system. If the system doesn't change we will continue to turn on the TVs and see the same thing. We have to put the pressure on the people in charge in order to get this thing we call JUSTICE right."

ESPN Staff Writer Jean-Jacques Taylor contributed to this report.