Greg Ostendorf ESPN Staff Writer 

There are still remnants of burnt toilet paper on one of the oak trees at Toomer's Corner more than two days after somebody lit it on fire following Auburn's 18-13 win over LSU.

James Bowdon/ESPN
1hHeather Dinich

How the playoff committee measures strength of schedule

While all committee members are given tons of data to help assess the nation's best teams, some, like Wisconsin AD Barry Alvarez go deeper, using their own advanced metrics to rank teams.

AP Photo/Walter Scriptunas II
2hJared Shanker

ACC providing the fireworks again in Week 5

The ACC will be the focus of the college football world again this weekend, led by the top-5 showdown between Louisville and Clemson.

David M. Hale ESPN Staff Writer 

Is Deshaun Watson running less this year? Through 4 games in 2015, Watson had 35 rushes, not counting sacks. Through 4 games this season, he has 33. Doesn't seem like much of a change, but here's why that's actually a huge difference… In 2015, Clemson's offense had run 289 plays through four games. This year, that number is 323. In addition, just six of Watson's rushes last season were a scramble (as opposed to a designed run), while nine have been this year. When accounting for those differences, Watson ran by design once every 10 offensive plays last year. This year, he's doing so every 14 plays, or approximately 40 percent less. And while Watson is running less often, he's also running less effectively. Last year, he averaged 5.94 yards per run through four games. This year, just 4.03 — a 32 percent drop. That can almost entirely be explained by the offensive line. Watson's yards-per-rush (not counting sacks) average before contact has been cut nearly in half, from 4.09 per carry to 2.24. Taken together, Watson's overall rushing production — fewer attempts, less yards-per-rush — is down about 43 percent from the first four games of last season.

Jared Shanker ESPN Staff Writer 

Against FBS teams, no program is worse defending the pass statistically than Pitt, which ranks 128th in yards per game (441.7). Oklahoma State and North Carolina can really sling the ball around, but Pitt coach Pat Narduzzi blames details in the secondary, too. "When you face a good football team, the attention to detail and fundamentals have to be perfect," Narduzzi said. He added Pitt will simplify defensively.

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2h

Mike & Mike: LSU's search for new coach

Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic share their thoughts on Notre Dame's firing of Brian VanGorder, chat with SEC Network's Paul Finebaum about LSU's coach search and more.

Jared Shanker ESPN Staff Writer 

Does the name Andrew Brown ring a bell? To help jog your memory, Brown was the fifth-ranked player in the 2014 class and No. 1 defensive tackle, and he's finally emerging into a star, surpassing his career totals in sacks and TFLs in just four games for Virginia. "He continues to be just completely disruptive and teams that don't have some kind of plan to chip or double him, we end up sacking the quarterback pretty early and pretty often," coach Bronco Mendenhall said.

Kirby Lee/USA TODAY Sports
2hAdam Rittenberg

What in the world is going on at USC?

Clay Helton billed himself as the no-Hollywood coach, but his first year at USC has had more drama and plot twists than expected, leaving many to wonder about his future with the Trojans.

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ACC making its CFP case

This week's Clemson vs. Louisville matchup could have playoff implications for the ACC, and Heather Dinich explains why the winner will be in the driver's seat.

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ACC making its College Football Playoff case (0:40)