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Thompson plans to appeal drunkenness conviction

OKLAHOMA CITY -- The attorney for a former University of
Oklahoma quarterback planned to appeal his municipal court
conviction on a misdemeanor charge of public drunkenness.

Judge William Manger dismissed a misdemeanor charge of
disturbing the peace after witnesses failed to appear at the trial
Monday in Oklahoma City Municipal Court.

Manger found Charles Thompson guilty after about two hours of
testimony, saying consistent testimony from three police officers
proved the case.

The officers testified they responded about 1 a.m. Nov. 18 to
the Residence Inn in west Oklahoma City after hotel managers
claimed they received multiple noise complaints about Thompson's
room.

When they arrived, Thompson smelled of alcohol and was
belligerent, the officers alleged. After arguing with police for
several minutes, Thompson stepped out of the room and told
officers, "Then take me to jail," the officers said.

Thompson and witnesses who were in the room said they were at
the hotel preparing for a little league football game. After
watching film with the kids, several coaches and parents stayed in
the room to decorate banners and make final preparations for the
game, they said.

The witnesses testified there was no alcohol at the event and
Thompson wasn't drinking that night. They also accused officers of
being aggressive and using profanity when they arrived.

Attorney Michael Johnson said Thompson is appealing the decision
to make a point.

"This is an unjustified attack on Mr. Thompson's character and
integrity," Johnson said. "We intend to take this all the way."

Thompson, 38, led the Sooners to an 11-1 season in 1987. He was
arrested in 1989, a tumultuous year for the program, on charges he
sold 17 grams of cocaine to undercover FBI agents for $1,400.

Following his arrest, Thompson appeared on the cover of "Sports
Illustrated" magazine in handcuffs and an orange jail-issue
jumpsuit. He eventually went to prison as a result of the charges.

Thompson most recently worked as a color analyst covering high
school football games for Oklahoma City sports radio station WWLS.