New York Teams

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Among those from the NBA who will march in the NYC Pride Parade today include: commissioner Adam Silver, deputy commissioner Mark Tatum, Knicks president Steve Mills, Reggie Bullock of the Pistons and Milwaukee's John Henson.

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Cool moment from the NBA on draft night. Kayla Solomon, an 11-year-old from Central Islip, NY and Tyler Eng, 11, from Brooklyn, presented Knicks rookie Kevin Knox with an NYK hat right after he was drafted. "It's been amazing I got to meet all these rookies that could turn into future all-stars . It's a lot of fun I got all their signatures and autographs," Eng said. Eng and Solomon both earned the draft night honor by winning a regional Junior NBA skills competition.

Dodgers top Mets behind Kemp's grand slam (1:22)
Bellinger triples after ball hits Conforto's glove (0:39)

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

On behalf of his foundation, Emmanuel Mudiay hosted dozens of young basketball players for a camp at the National Basketball Players Association on Saturday in conjunction with Go Hoop Day. He took some time to answer a few questions about the Knicks. Here, he talks about how all the players have a fresh start under new coach David Fizdale: "We're all kind of starting from scratch. But it's a positive scratch. It's big to see that people are actually loving what the front office is doing, loving what the coaching staff is doing. Everybody's supportive. So that's a good thing." Mudiay was asked if it feels like a ‘new vibe' under Fizdale. "For sure. It's like night and day to be honest. You could just see people having confidence in themselves. And Fiz did a great job connecting with the players. Not only him but his coaching staff." Mudiay plans to spend some time in New York during the rest of the offseason. The NBPA will host camps in New York City with other Knicks, including Tim Hardaway Jr., later this summer.

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

On behalf of his foundation, Emmanuel Mudiay hosted dozens of young basketball players for a camp at the National Basketball Players Association on Saturday in conjunction with Go Hoop Day. He took some time to answer a few questions about the Knicks. Here, he talks about the benefits of David Fizdale working on the court with players during voluntary workouts at the training facility: "Every time I've been here he's been in the gym with us. A lot of people don't know that he was also a skills and training coach for a little bit. To be a head coach who can also get out there with you is huge. It doesn't only put confidence in you but it puts trust in you and I feel like that's definitely somebody that I can trust." Mudiay has been working at the facility with other young Knicks lately and has spent time in Dallas this offseason.

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

On behalf of his foundation, Emmanuel Mudiay hosted dozens of young basketball players for a camp at the National Basketball Players Association on Saturday in conjunction with Go Hoop Day. He took some time to answer a few questions about the Knicks. Here, he offers his impressions of new Knicks coach David Fizdale: "I love it man. Fiz, he can connect with us, the younger generation really good. But at the same time he has experience bhe's been a world champion with the Miami Heat. There's nothing that he hasn't seen. He's seen the best of the best. And in a good way, the worst of the worst too. He knows the ins and outs," Mudiay said. "And I've been like a sponge around him, just trying to pick up everything I can pick up. And he's been encouraging not just me but the whole team to continue to develop. One thing I love about him is he's big on development. We're a young team so we've got to development."

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

David Fizdale said the instinct Mitchell Robinson showed in the Jordan Brand Classic in 2017 reminded him of Houston big man Clint Capela. "I watched the film. Impressive. If you watch, you'll see what (Knicks GM) Scott (Perry) and those guys saw. His timing is incredible. He has a great motor, super long. He has that instinct that Capella has," Fizdale said. "If everybody had it they'd all do it. This kid was doing it very easily at a young age. Hopefully we can build on that, really give him a defined role, like a Capella type of guy." The Knicks selected Robinson with the No. 36 pick in the second round. The 7-1 center didn't play organized basketball last season, choosing to train for the NBA rather than play in college.

Greg Wyshynski ESPN 

Ilya Kovalchuk's selection of the Los Angeles Kings for his next NHL destination was eight years in the making. In 2010, he only had two teams he was considering: The New Jersey Devils, with whom he would sign a ridiculous (and illegal, it turns out) 17-year contract; and the Kings, who courted him heavily. "New Jersey offered more money. Simple as that. We threw everything we had at him while leaving cap space necessary to sign our kids," said CEO Tim Leiweke at the time. Leiweke is now in Seattle, closing in on bringing an NHL team there. Kovalchuk, 35, is now a member of the Kings for $6.25 million annually for the next three seasons. Funny how things work out.

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

David Fizdale on his approach to giving playing time to the younger players on Knicks: "I'm not handing out nothing. Everything will be earned. Obviously we're going to have a super young team. I felt like why even disrupt the culture by handing something to a kid? Make them earn everything along the way is going to make them tougher. They'll become better teammates, they'll believe in what we're doing more, if they feel it's a fair shake."

Rays edge Yanks (1:12)
Bellinger's grand slam propels L.A. (0:58)

Emily Kaplan ESPN 

The New York Rangers traded up to select K'Andre Miller at No. 22. "Being African American, the opportunity doesn't come very often. I worked very hard to be in this position."

Adames robs fellow SS Gregorius (0:34)
Stanton shows off the glove (0:46)

1927 Yankees diary

  • Robert Hunt
  • Immerse yourself in the 1927 Yankees

    "The Diary of Myles Thomas" is an experiment in storytelling, a genre we're calling real-time historical fiction. Experience the Roaring Twenties through the eyes of a mediocre pitcher on the greatest baseball team of all time.