New York Teams

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Adam Rubin ESPN Staff Writer 

Noah Syndergaard reacts to allowing one run in six innings Tuesday in his return from strep throat. His next start will be either the wild-card game or, if the Mets need it, the final day of the regular season.

Andrew Marchand ESPN Senior Writer 

When David Ortiz strolled to the plate, representing the go-ahead run with two outs in the ninth, Yankees manager Joe Girardi thought, "I was like, 'What are the chances he is coming up in this situation. It is kind of the way fate had it tonight." Ortiz struck out against Tyler Clippard to end the game, preventing the Red Sox from clinching the AL East.

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Austin honored to share field with Ortiz (0:46)
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Yankees snap Red Sox's 11-game win streak (1:10)
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Price's struggles against Yankees continue in loss on Tuesday (1:45)

Adam Rubin ESPN Staff Writer 

Jay Bruce and Yoenis Cespedes each produced early two-run homers and Syndergaard logged six innings in his first start in eight days as the Mets beat the Marlins, 12-1, Tuesday. The Mets (84-74) opened a one-game lead over the Giants and a 1½-game lead over the Cardinals in the wild-card standings pending the outcome of their games later in the evening.

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Ortiz strikes out to end game (0:20)

Adam Rubin ESPN Staff Writer 

Surprise, surprise. Juan Lagares can swing a bat. Lagares delivered a ninth-inning sacrifice fly in a rout of the Marlins. Lagares had entered as a defensive replacement. It was his first time swinging in a major league game since undergoing surgery to repair a torn ligament in his left thumb on Aug. 1. Lagares had been activated from the DL as a defensive replacement and pinch runner. His only other batting opportunity since returning resulted in a sacrifice bunt.

Matthew Hazlett/Getty Images

Mets counting on Syndergaard

The Mets face two more emotional games in Miami, followed by three in Philadelphia. But at least they have Noah Syndergaard back in the rotation. He's the last ace standing -- and the Mets have never needed him more. Baseball's final week madness

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Austin's two-run shot puts Yankees in front (0:29)
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Andrew Marchand ESPN Senior Writer 

During the Yankees-Red Sox game, the biggest error of the game nearly occurred in the middle of the fifth inning in the left field stands. Andrew Fox of New Castle, PA tried to propose to his girlfriend, Heather Terwilliger of Fredonia, New York, but he dropped the ring. with the whole crowd watching, it took five minutes to locate it, but it felt like an hour to the couple. She said yes.

Adam Rubin ESPN Staff Writer 

Noah Syndergaard allowed one run in six innings and logged 93 pitches on Tuesday against the Marlins, He originally had been scheduled to start on Saturday, but strep throat prompted the Mets to delay the outing by three days. With the adjusted schedule, he now is lined up to pitch the final day of the regular season, on Sunday at Philadelphia. In an ideal scenario, the Mets will have clinched a postseason berth before the finale, allowing manager Terry Collins to instead be held back for next Wednesday's wild-card game.

Adam Rubin ESPN Staff Writer 

Yoenis Cespedes' homer registered 440 feet and struck the artwork in left-center at Marlins Park. It was his fourth homer this season of at least that distance. The other Mets have combined for three homers of 440 feet or more.

Michael Reaves/Getty Images
2hBrett Okamoto

McGregor mocks Alvarez, predicts first-round KO

Conor McGregor took center stage at Tuesday's UFC 205 news conference, calling upcoming opponent Eddie Alvarez a "broke bum" and predicting a first-round KO on Nov. 12 at Madison Square Garden.

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Unbelievably dramatic wedding proposal at Yankees-Red Sox game (1:22)
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Cespedes crushes huge home run (0:23)

Andrew Marchand ESPN Senior Writer 

They found the ring! That was the announcement from Yankees Public Address announcer Paul Olden during the fifth inning of the Yankees-Red Sox game. In the middle of the fifth, a man in a Yankee jersey proposed to his girlfirend on the big video board. When he went to open the ring box, the ring was missing. After fans around their section in left field searched for it, it was found. She said yes.

Rich Cimini ESPN Staff Writer 

Jets WR Brandon Marshall, commenting on tonight's episode of Showtime's "Inside the NFL," offered his take on Odell Beckham Jr. "What I see is a guy who loves football," Marshall said. "What I see is a guy who is passionate. What I see is a guy who hates losing. What I see is a guy who would run through a brick wall for his teammates. But, what I see is a guy who needs to learn how to control his emotions, because that is what I deal with every single Sunday."

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Carmelo Anthony said he and other players appreciated Jeff Hornacek's approach to the offseason: "He made himself visible to us in the offseason, open to talk, wanting to learn from us, wanting to learn about us as players and visa versa."

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Carmelo Anthony was impressed with Jeff Hornacek on the first day of training camp. "I thought he took control of the court out there. He made his voice very clear. It was loud and clear. He told us what he wanted from us, what he expects from us. And I thought guys responded well to that."

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Derrick Rose hopes to energize the crowd at MSG this season. "When you think about New York, you think about some of the older teams they had. So we're just trying to rejuvenate the city and bring that excitement back. The fans come to the game already. But just bring that excitement back."

Ian Begley ESPN Staff Writer 

Interesting thought from Carmelo Anthony on how some ascribe leadership qualities to players: "When you win, people automatically give you leadership qualities. When you lose they automatically say you don't have leadership qualities. We want to change that this year."

1927 Yankees diary

  • Robert Hunt
  • Immerse yourself in the 1927 Yankees

    "The Diary of Myles Thomas" is an experiment in storytelling, a genre we're calling real-time historical fiction. Experience the Roaring Twenties through the eyes of a mediocre pitcher on the greatest baseball team of all time.