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Best 2019 NFL draft value picks for all 32 teams: Todd McShay's favorites

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Kyler Murray should adapt quickly to Kliff Kingsbury's offense (2:20)

Bill Barnwell explains why No. 1 overall draft pick Kyler Murray has a good chance to succeed with Kilff Kingsbury and the Arizona Cardinals. (2:20)

It's clear that NFL teams are drafting smarter and smarter every year, so it's no easy chore to pick the best 2019 NFL draft pick for each franchise. So many teams did good work on Days 2 and 3 in securing contributors at value. I especially liked the way the Colts, Patriots, Broncos and Chiefs managed the draft. But I wanted to highlight one pick for all 32 teams that stood out.

Remember: "Best pick" does not necessarily mean "best player." Team needs, the value a player presented in comparison to my board, and any trades related to the pick all factor in here. New 49ers pass-rusher Nick Bosa is obviously the top prospect, but that doesn't necessarily mean he is the Niners' best pick of the weekend in Nashville. (Spoiler: He's not).

Let's get into it, starting with the Cardinals -- or jump to any team below.


Arizona Cardinals

Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma (Round 1, No. 1 overall)

Simply put, this Murray pick will define the Kliff Kingsbury era in Arizona. The Cardinals made a decision to move on from a quarterback whom they selected in the top 10 just a year ago and sacrificed quite a bit to do so. But they love Murray that much. It's either going to work or it won't, but Kingsbury and that coaching staff need to maximize the way they use him in the NFL for it to all pay off.

All that said, this kid is something to watch. He makes good decisions with the football, shows poise under pressure and throws accurately from different arm angles, getting the ball out quickly with good touch. And he can definitely drive the ball vertically downfield. All of this is to say nothing of his playmaking skill, too. I haven't seen a quarterback prospect with this much athleticism and explosiveness since Michael Vick in 2001. He's fun to watch, and he's going to fit nicely with Kingsbury's scheme and David Johnson's pass-catching abilities. I also really liked that the Cards not only added some receiving help, but also three very different receiver types: Hakeem Butler is a possession guy, Andy Isabella is a vertical slot receiver and KeeSean Johnson is a big target downfield. The No. 32 scoring offense of 2018 could suddenly be something special.


Atlanta Falcons

Chris Lindstrom, G, Boston College (Round 1, No. 14 overall)

It was maybe a little bit early to take Lindstrom, sure. But he's a plug-and-play guy, and Atlanta desperately needed to find protection for Matt Ryan. He took 42 sacks last season and was constantly under pressure. Guard was really the big area of concern, too. For one, six different players started at guard for the Falcons in 2018. For two, much as is the case with Tom Brady, Ryan most needs protection on the inside. He can climb but isn't great at avoiding interior pressure and sliding when necessary. Lindstrom will help buy him time.

The Boston College product turned heads with his 4.91 40-yard dash at the combine, and once you add in his length, you can see why he excels in pushing speed rushers past the pocket. He has very good lateral mobility as well, and he is very good when blocking at the second level (Atlanta's run game was 27th in rushing yards in 2018). Combined with the team's pick of Kaleb McGary at No. 31, the Falcons did a nice job targeting a need.


Baltimore Ravens

Marquise Brown, WR, Oklahoma (Round 1, No. 25 overall)