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WR Michael Floyd signs contract with hometown Vikings

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Floyd looking to rejuvenate career in Minnesota (0:54)

Josina Anderson details Michael Floyd's one-year deal with the Vikings. (0:54)

MINNEAPOLIS -- As Michael Floyd tries to reboot his NFL career, he'll do it in his home state.

The former Arizona Cardinals and New England Patriots receiver signed a deal with the Minnesota Vikings on Wednesday.

Floyd, who starred at Cretin-Derham Hall in St. Paul -- the high school that produced Joe Mauer, Paul Molitor and Matt Birk -- will join a group of receivers that includes Adam Thielen, Stefon Diggs and 2016 first-round pick Laquon Treadwell. His one-year deal is worth $1.5 million, with incentives that could boost the total to as much as $6 million, a league source said.

Floyd tweeted his excitement at returning to play in his home state.

He still could face NFL discipline after being sentenced to 24 days in jail and 96 days of house arrest on Feb. 17, stemming from his Dec. 12, 2016, arrest for DUI in Arizona. Floyd finished the year with the Patriots, playing in two regular-season games and earning a Super Bowl ring, but is serving his sentence in Arizona and won't be able to leave the state until the conclusion of NFL minicamps in June. Floyd was released by the Cardinals two days after the arrest.

"Coach [Mike] Zimmer and I are confident Michael Floyd has learned and grown from his past decisions. He has accepted full responsibility and is taking encouraging steps to improve," Vikings general manager Rick Spielman said in a statement. "We have offered Michael the full support and assistance of the Minnesota Vikings organization and our player development programs.

"We are aware that Michael is subject to discipline from the NFL and will work with both him and the NFL in a professional manner. We are excited to have Michael and believe he can be a productive member of our football team and community."

Floyd said he has "been training extremely hard this offseason, in addition to taking responsibility and paying the consequences for my mistake.

"Although I cannot change my past decisions," he added, "I have definitely learned from this experience and look forward to making valuable contributions to the Vikings organization and the Minnesota community, both as a player and a person. Time to go to work."

Former Vikings star and Pro Football Hall of Famer Cris Carter welcomed Floyd home and pointed out that he also was doubted for off-the-field trouble and is proof that a player can change his narrative from negative to positive.

Carter said he spoke to Floyd after he agreed to terms with the Vikings.

"The state of Minnesota has been at the forefront of recovery,'' Carter told the Duluth News Tribune. "It was for me, and Michael has embraced that he's got a problem. He's sought to get help and Minneapolis is a great place.

"I'm sure the Vikings are going to put support around him, and me being a former Viking that struggled with things, the team really helped me. Being a fan of Michael Floyd, I'm pulling for him. I'll try to help him with anything that I can in his assimilation back into being a very good football player.''

Floyd's best season came in 2013, when he caught 65 passes for 1,041 yards and five touchdowns with the Cardinals. His arrival in Minnesota adds a downfield threat to an offense that didn't have many such options in 2016.

Thielen, who earned a three-year contract extension this spring, was the only Vikings receiver to average more than 10 air yards per target last season, with Diggs coming in second at 8.51 air yards per target.

Playing primarily in the Cardinals' aggressive downfield passing game, Floyd has averaged 14.65 air yards per target during his career.

His arrival means another player to compete with Treadwell, who caught just one pass in 2016. Zimmer has said he expects Treadwell will be much improved in 2017, but Treadwell will have to compete with a group that includes Floyd, sixth-year receiver Jarius Wright and rookies Rodney Adams and Stacy Coley for playing time behind Diggs and Thielen.