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Matt Patricia trying to change Lions' culture with more physicality

ALLEN PARK, Mich. -- Matt Patricia had players lay down on the ground, offense on one side, defense on the other. At the whistle, they popped back up and the offensive player -- the ball carrier -- then had to try to beat the defensive player one-on-one.

On the first padded day of Detroit Lions practice Sunday, they ran a modified version of the Oklahoma drill -- just one example of the physicality and intensity under Patricia, the first-year Lions head coach, who is trying to change the culture of a team that hasn't won a division title since 1993.

To do so, Patricia said at some point the Lions will tackle to the ground -- a stark difference from former coach Jim Caldwell, who rarely had live tackling during practices. Patricia does want to keep his players upright for the most part, but he recognizes there are times that tackling has to happen.

Just to be prepared.

"At some point you have to go live. You have to be able to experience that both offensively and defensively because you don't want to do it for the first time in a game," Patricia said. "You have to be able to get in good position. There's certainly a manner in which we can practice in pads where we can thud each other up and be in a good hit position and know that from the strike standpoint everything is clean and we're in good space but then not really follow through or try to finish at that exact moment.

"But at some point you have to transition into the finish and be able to make sure you understand what that feels like and that we're doing it the right way."

It led to Patricia calling Sunday "the most exciting day of the year," because it's the first time his team is able to put on pads and actually have more consistent contact. It's also the first time he had a team under his control in pads for the first time.

Patricia said while working in pads is something that is made a big deal of, he believes players should always want to play in pads for both protection and to get used to it since they'll be wearing full pads during games. It also forces players to get to another conditioning level because of some restrictions pads place on players.

The potential for more tackling and contact is just one area where Patricia has changed Lions practices. Detroit does more running under Patricia than it did under Caldwell -- including running laps for mistakes made in practice, something the defense had to do at least once Sunday.

On Friday, Patricia opened his first training camp practice by working on goal-line strategy because of the importance Patricia places on it in games. The Lions offensively struggled in goal-line and short-yardage situations in 2017, something general manager Bob Quinn said after the draft bothered him during Caldwell's final season.

Now, as the pads go on, they can work on that even more. The players noticed an increased energy having pads on as well. The linemen can hit. The players move just a little faster. For the third straight day, practice ran at least two hours.

"It's definitely physical and that's what we want to be, a physical team," receiver Marvin Jones said. "So we're out here working hard and the most dominant team wins every Sunday, so that's what we have to be and that's how we practice.

"And we're all taking to it."