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Carson Wentz had separate stress fracture discovered in college

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Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz had a separate stress fracture in his back that was discovered while he was redshirting during his freshman year at North Dakota State, a league source tells ESPN.

The injury, from his adolescence, was completely healed by the time he was in college and is unrelated to Wentz's current injury, the source said.

Wentz's medical report, given to teams at the NFL scouting combine prior to the 2016 draft, referred to a healed stress fracture in his back, the Philadelphia Daily News first reported.

It also did not affect his draft stock, as he was selected No. 2 overall by the Eagles.

The current stress fracture was discovered following a CT scan last Tuesday, according to Eagles coach Doug Pederson.

Wentz sat out last week's victory against the Los Angeles Rams, and it appears he'll be sidelined again Sunday, as Pederson has named Nick Foles the starter for the Eagles' upcoming game against the Houston Texans.

"He'll be listed as week-to-week. We will not put him on [injured reserve]," Pederson said of Wentz. "Obviously when he's healthy, he's our quarterback, and we'll go from there."

Wentz was first listed on the injury report with a back issue in late October. He was feeling better symptom-wise as the season progressed, a source said.

Pederson noted the recovery period could be about three months, though that is not set in stone. Optimism remains that Wentz, who is coming off multiligament knee surgery, will not be hampered by the back issue long term.

"The fact that he doesn't need surgery on this, I mean, is the best news that you could possibly have on anybody that has a stress fracture or a stress injury in this case," Pederson said last week. "As long as we take the proper steps to make sure that all our players are 100 percent, then [there is no long-term concern]."