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Olympic bosses monitor PyeongChang 2018 security as Korean tensions rise

The Gangneung Hockey Centre in PyeongChang, South Korea. Tom Pennington/Getty Images

The 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea "continue to be on track" despite rising tensions in the region, according to the International Olympic Committee.

Earlier this week, United States President Donald Trump warned North Korea it will be met with "fire and fury" if it continues to threaten the US and its allies, Japan and South Korea.

This followed North Korea performing two missile tests last month and intelligence reports that the rogue state is close to developing nuclear weapons that could strike the US.

The Winter Games will be held in PyeongChang, which is only 50 miles south of the demilitarised zone which has divided the Asian peninsula since the end of the Korean War in 1953.

An International Olympic Committee [IOC] spokesperson said: "We are monitoring the situation on the Korean peninsula and the region very closely. The IOC is keeping itself informed about the developments.

"We continue working with the organising committee on the preparations of these Games which continue to be on track."

Already under United Nations sanctions, North Korea has been hit with further measures since the missile tests, ratcheting up the rhetoric on both sides.

Trump's message was followed by North Korea saying it would consider targeting Guam, a US island territory in the western Pacific which is home to several American naval bases.

When PyeongChang's staging of the Games was announced in 2011, it had been hoped it would help bring the two Koreas closer together, with talk of a joint team and even the suggestion that some events could be staged north of the border.

That prospect is off the table now and it seems unlikely that any North Korean athletes will travel to the Games, which start on February 9.