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Nicolas Batum, Joakim Noah shaken by attacks on Paris

CHICAGO -- Nicolas Batum couldn't believe what he was hearing.

The Charlotte Hornets swingman and native of France couldn't believe what was transpiring Friday while he watched the France-Germany soccer friendly online as terrorist attacks on Paris occurred.

"Yeah, I was watching it," Batum said after Friday night's game against the Chicago Bulls. "We didn't see [the explosion] on TV, but I did hear it. They said the president was there ... I couldn't believe it. It was like a movie or something like that because it was too crazy to believe. Such a tough day."

Batum said his sister lives near the stadium where the match took place.

"She was close by. She's OK," Batum said. "All my family and friends are OK. But I'm sad and I'm praying for all the families who lost someone. So many people dying for this thing by stupid people. I don't know why they're doing that. I'm just praying for those people who lost someone today. France, we'll do everything we can to stop things like that. That's a terrible thing to happen to us. In January it happened, and 10 months later it happened again."

Like many around the world, Batum was shaken by what had happened.

"I'm fine, but I'm not because we lost people for nothing," Batum said. "Stupid people and I don't know why they are doing that. We've got to stay strong. I tried to show people in my way that we're strong and we won't [back] down because you are doing bad stuff to people. We'll keep our heads up, step forward and say we're better than that."

Batum said one of the first things he did once he stepped on the court for Friday's game was speak to Bulls center Joakim Noah, who grew up in France, and whose father, Yannick, is a well-known former professional tennis player.

"[It's] very sad what's going on in Paris," Noah said. "A lot of people died for no reason. We're not really sure exactly what happened. So just calling family before the game, making sure they're all right."

Noah said he texted with his father, who is currently in Cameroon, and that his family members who are in Paris are fine.

Batum scored a game-high 28 points in the 102-97 loss to the Bulls, but it is still understandably hard for him to wrap his mind around the reports he's getting from family and friends.

"They told me Paris is like a war outside," Batum said. "The army is outside. It's difficult because I watched the numbers. Before the game there were only 40 people killed. After the game they say 120. But we're strong, we're tough and we're going to be all right. We're going to stay strong and they won't get us."

Bulls big man Pau Gasol, who is from Spain, echoed the sentiments of many when he summed up his thoughts about the attacks.

"It's very sad," Gasol said. "Very sad, what's happened in Paris. You try to focus and do what you have to do but at the same time, your mind is there, your heart is there. And you know that a lot of people are suffering. A lot of people died. Overall, just devastating news. Hopefully at one point, these kind of attacks stop. It's just not human. Not fair."