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Matt Harvey back on track despite lack of support

NEW YORK -- New York Mets ace Matt Harvey statistically may have the toughest luck of any major league pitcher in the past 100 years.

In Saturday's 1-1 suspended game, Harvey limited the Cincinnati Reds to one run in six innings in a no-decision. It marked the 14th time in 51 career games he has allowed one run or fewer in a start and failed to earn the victory -- the most instances of any pitcher in the majors in the last century.

Even without the wins to show for it, Harvey has been on a tear of late. After a stretch in which he twice allowed a career-high seven runs, at Pittsburgh and against San Francisco, Harvey has now produced a 0.92 ERA in his past three starts. That ERA would have been sliced in half had right fielder Curtis Granderson been charged with an error on Tucker Barnhart's dropped fly ball in the fifth inning Saturday.

"I know it was a rough patch there," Harvey said. "I think just staying mentally focused and positive through now is definitely helping. Coming back [from Tommy John surgery], there's still days that I don't feel as great as I normally would. ... But we're finding ways to get it done. ... I have a whole new ligament in my elbow. So whether it's release point or certain pitches, I'm finding that it's a lot more tough than I anticipated, and that it was earlier in the season."

As for pitching in Saturday's wet conditions, Harvey added: "It was tough playing it just in general. I think we knew going into the game that it would be raining pretty much the whole time. So it was just battling through that and keeping the ball dry as much as possible, and the mound [dry]. They did a great job of keeping the field dry as much as they could."

Finally, Harvey labeled it a "gray area" how he will prepare between starts with a six-man rotation being implemented. With the Mets off Monday, Harvey will have a full week before pitching next Saturday at Dodger Stadium.

"It's something we're going to all have to adjust to and just make sure that we're sharp for our starts," Harvey said.