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'Crash' finishes with double-double

Crash” looked much more comfortable on Monday night.

In his second game as a Net, Gerald Wallace scored 27 points -- 13 in the fourth quarter -- and grabbed 12 rebounds in the team’s 105-100 loss to the Cavaliers at the Prudential Center.

“I felt good [Monday night],” said Wallace, who shot 8-for-14 from the field and 10-for-11 from the free throw line. “They put me in a situation where I thought I can be productive as far as posting up, isolations and 1-on-1. I felt a pretty good job [Monday night] in that situation.”

Wallace, who notched his seventh double-double of the season and first as Net, connected on a pair of three-point plays early in the final period, and drained an open 3-pointer from the right wing with 8:22 left to put the Nets in front 86-80. But he was more upset about how he missed a layup with 56 seconds remaining that would’ve tied the game at 99.

“Those are tough things to swallow when we fought so hard to get ourselves back in the game,” Wallace said.

Still, Wallace had difficulty remembering plays.

“There are still some situations where they call plays and you can hear Coach Johnson from the bench yelling at me to go here or there and to do this,” Wallace said. “I think that is going to happen for another week or two. Hopefully I can get the plays down and understand them.

“But it is difficult for me because as soon as I learn the plays from the 3, coach throws me in at the 4 and I can’t figure out when and where do I go. It is going to be tough in that situation. Hopefully we can make it through the season with pick-and-rolls and Deron [Williams] and Coach [Avery] Johnson screaming at me telling me where to go.”

After being acquired in a multi-player trade from Portland on Thursday, Wallace had 11 points, three rebounds, three assists and three blocks in 37 minutes in his debut with his new team on Saturday night. He was brought in to provide defense, leadership and make hustle plays, and he has.

“We pulled out a few of the plays that he likes, especially some that he ran in Charlotte,” Johnson said. “We had some isolations and some post-up plays but he was all over the place. He really gave us a lot of energy, shot the ball well and got to the free throw line.”

Wallace was asked about Johnson’s distinctive voice.

“I do [notice it],” Wallace replied. “But I wish he wouldn’t scream so much, because it kind of gives the play away, so it defeats the purpose of not calling the play. I’m going to try to learn it so he doesn’t have to shout it out so loud and everybody will know the play.”