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Pressure on Brian Schottenheimer in Year 1

There was a lot of turnover at the coordinator ranks in the SEC this offseason. If you're keeping score at home -- and we know you are SEC fanatics -- 14 coordinating changes took place.

Before anyone runs a route in practice or sets up for blocking drills, debates will rage about which schools made the best hires. We will also debate who enters 2015 with the biggest target on his back and the most pressure to deal with.

That's what we will focus on right now: pressure. Honestly, with so much movement, you could have a field day with who you think has the smallest margin for error in his new home. Take Will Muschamp and John Chavis for instance. Both are considered defensive wizards, but their moves this offseason come with hefty expectations. Muschamp moved from being the head coach at Florida to trying to repair an Auburn defense that has been awful the past two seasons. Chavis left LSU for Texas A&M with the responsibility to turn around yet another cringe-worthy defense.

Oh, and both broke the bank with their contracts. If they fail to make any sort of immediate improvement with two units that can only go up, and you better believe they will be viewed as major disappointments.

You also have head coach Derek Mason taking over defensive responsibilities at Vanderbilt, and Doug Nussmeier pegged as what feels like the 10th coach in the past five years to resurrect Florida's offense. And what about the interesting hire of Mike DeBord at Tennessee? He hasn't coached any football since 2012, and has to keep an upstart offense going.

All of these guys will feel some sort of heat if they don't excite fans or get the ball rolling early. But the coordinator feeling the most pressure in Year 1 at his new digs is Georgia offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer.

Yes, the man picked to replace the enigmatic -- but very successful -- Mike Bobo can't afford to slip one bit in his first year in Athens. Though he has to figure out who his quarterback will be, Schottenheimer, who served as the St. Louis Rams' offensive coordinator the past three seasons, has the benefit of returning four experienced offensive line starters, a solid receiving corps led by vets Malcolm Mitchell and Justin Scott-Wesley, and possibly the nation's best running back in sophomore Nick Chubb. He has weapons at his disposal, but he still has to get them in the right position.

With so many questions in the SEC Eastern Division (again), Georgia is the early and maybe obvious favorite to take the division. This team has enough depth and talent coming back on both sides of the ball to win more than just the SEC East, but we've certainly seen this movie before when it comes to Georgia. Getting out of its own way has been a major issue for Georgia, but excuses won't really fly this season ... not with how last season ended.

With the way defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt burst onto the scene with a very successful first year in Athens, fans won't approve of a drop-off from Schottenheimer, who wasn't exactly the "wow hire" fans were looking for. The Rams' offense, which did endure some tough injuries, ranked 28th in the NFL in total offense last season, and his bouncing around the NFL has been met with mixed reviews.

But Georgia's offensive philosophy won't change under Schottenheimer. Though Bobo endured a lot of criticism from fans, his offenses were some of the best in the SEC for much of his Georgia tenure. The Bulldogs' offense has ranked among the top four of the SEC the past four seasons, and Bobo's final season ended with Georgia ranking fourth in the league, averaging 457.8 yards per game and a conference-high 6.79 yards per play.

With Chubb, who ran for 1,547 yards and 14 touchdowns last season, Schottenheimer's first option will -- and should -- be to hand the ball off, as he helps groom a new quarterback. Though this offense should be Chubb-centric, Schottenheimer must help create a more explosive passing game this season. Georgia's passing fell off during the transition from Aaron Murray to Hutson Mason, and the Dawgs just can't endure another average year through the air. There needs to be a legitimate threat of the deep ball.

Georgia's offense, while predicated on running the ball, is very balanced, and Schottenheimer can't stray away from that mindset. Not in a year in which the Bulldogs should be on top of the East and maybe making a playoff run.

The pieces are in place for Schottenheimer to make a smooth transition, but there will be very little leeway from a fan base thirsty for a championship and still trying to feel out its new coordinator.