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The summer of David Ortiz in perspective

David Ortiz leads MLB in extra-base hits this season Rich Gagnon/Getty Images

David Ortiz punctuated a historic first half of his final season with his seventh All-Star Game start. Just how good has he been for the Boston Red Sox? Consider this:

No player in history has led the majors in slugging percentage or OPS in his final season (minimum 400 plate appearances), according to Elias Sports Bureau research. Ortiz is on pace to do both.

Ortiz is on pace to become the first player in major league history with 40 home runs and 60 doubles in one season. He is on pace for 63 doubles; no player has hit 60 doubles in a season since 1936 (Joe Medwick and Charlie Gehringer).

Ortiz leads the majors in extra-base hits (57), the oldest player to do so at the break, according to Elias Sports Bureau research. No player has led the majors in extra-base hits in his final season.

He is on pace for 106 extra-base hits. The only players in MLB history with more in one season are Babe Ruth (1921), Lou Gehrig (1927), Chuck Klein (1930) and Barry Bonds (2001).

Of course, Ortiz wouldn’t be the first athlete to end his career on a high note. How does his 2016 campaign stack up to these legendary final seasons?

Jim Brown in 1965 (age-29 season)

- Led NFL in rushing yards (1,544) and rushing touchdowns (17)

- Won The Associated Press NFL MVP Award

- Led Cleveland Browns to 11-3 regular season (lost to the Packers in NFL Championship)

Sandy Koufax in 1966 (age-30 season)

- Led MLB in wins (27), ERA (1.73) and strikeouts (317)

- Only pitcher in MLB history to win the Cy Young in his final season

- Led Los Angeles Dodgers to World Series (lost to the Orioles)

Bill Russell in 1968-69 (age-34 season)

- 19.3 rebounds per game (most in final season in NBA history)

- Finished fourth in MVP voting

- Led Boston Celtics to NBA title (beat the Lakers)

Wilt Chamberlain in 1972-73 (age-36 season)

- Led NBA in rebounds per game (18.6) and field goal percentage (72.7 percent)

- Finished fourth in MVP voting

- Led Los Angeles Lakers to NBA Finals (lost to the Knicks)

John Elway in 1998 (age-38 season)

- Became first quarterback in NFL history to win Super Bowl in final game

- Became oldest player to win Super Bowl MVP

Patrick Roy in 2002-03 (age-37 season)

- 35 wins (most in final season in NHL history)

- Finished fourth in Vezina Trophy voting (top goalie)