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Miami Hurricanes to retire 'turnover chain,' according to new football coach Mario Cristobal

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Mario Cristobal optimistic about Miami's football future (3:17)

Coach Mario Cristobal talks about his plans to make Miami as good as any team in college football history. (3:17)

The Miami Hurricanes are ditching the "turnover chain" for the 2022 season, according to first-year coach Mario Cristobal.

Cristobal confirmed the decision Thursday at ACC media days.

"Let's put it this way -- we've been working so hard and paying attention to so many other things that, in my opinion, are much more critical to winning football games and having success that it really hasn't been a subject or a topic," Cristobal said. "We won't be using it."

The turnover chain is an oversized 36-inch, 2.5-kilogram, 10-karat gold chain worn by Miami players on the sideline after forcing a turnover.

The chain has been used by the Hurricanes since the first game of the 2017 season under former coach Mark Richt and remained a sideline feature over the past three seasons under Cristobal's predecessor, Manny Diaz.

Cristobal told the Action Network on Wednesday that the turnover chain is "not part of our culture," according to a tweet from the publication. One day later, Cristobal said that his decision is "not a shot or form of disrespect to anybody or anyone."

"Certainly history is history, and whether it's positive, whether it's inconsequential, whatever it may be, it's still history and part of your program," Cristobal said. "We're just moving in a direction that right now doesn't involve it. That's really the best way to address it."

The Hurricanes hired Cristobal as their new coach in December, after he led Oregon for four seasons. A Miami native, Cristobal won two national championships as a Hurricanes player and earned two degrees from the school.

"We just really focus on getting better as a program and have focused on technique, fundamentals, regimentation, academics, strength and conditioning, sports science, community service," he said. "That's what the focus has been on."

ESPN's Andrea Adelson contributed to this report.