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World Series 2020: The Tampa Bay Rays are down only 2-1. Here's why it feels a whole lot worse

ARLINGTON, Texas -- For the moment, the Tampa Bay Rays have answered a question that lingered even after Wednesday's six-run output in their World Series Game 2 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. It went something like this: Was the Rays' anemic postseason offense waking up, or did they just get a one-day reprieve because the Dodgers pitched a bullpen game that night?

Games 1 and 3 gave us the answers we need, as the Rays put up little fight in the batter's box in either contest and now find themselves down 2-1 in the series with their own version of a bullpen game looming.

"We need to find a way to win, that's for sure," manager Kevin Cash simply stated after the latest loss.

It doesn't help that the Dodgers have dynamic lefties Julio Urias and Clayton Kershaw lined up for the next two nights. The Rays are just 11-11 this season when a lefty starts against them. In other words, the path to a championship got a whole lot harder for the American League representative. Catcher Mike Zunino is taking the proverbial glass-half-full approach.

"Guys have been hitting the ball hard lately," he said. "The luck hasn't been there, but that's all part of it. We have to stay consistent and put our work in. Eventually we'll get some bounces."

But are they running out of time?

If the Dodgers were planning several more bullpen games, it wouldn't be fair to eliminate Game 2 from the Rays' offensive statistics. But they're not, so it's appropriate to look at it this way. Minus that game, the Rays are 10-for-62 (.161) with 23 strikeouts in their two World Series losses. For the entire postseason, minus Game 2 of this series, they're hitting just .203.

Again, unless the Dodgers are throwing more of their "B" relievers, these are the numbers that matter. And what about all that talk of a Brandon Lowe breakout after his two-homer performance on Wednesday? His three-strikeout night in Game 3 is a nice microcosm of the Rays right now: Their production has been spotty at best this postseason.

"We see it quite a bit when our pitching is on and we go against good offenses," Cash stated. "That's what we saw on the flip side [in Game 3]. Just dominant, dominant stuff."

The scary part for the Rays is Game 3 winner Walker Buehler had a "lofty" ERA of 1.89 coming into the night when compared to Game 4 starter Urias, whose 0.56 mark leads all starting pitchers this postseason. As do his four wins.

The Rays' best shot is to scratch a run or two across the board as early as possible. They're a major-league-best 31-7 when scoring first this season.

"We seem to be a much better club when we get early leads," Cash said. "Whatever we can do to get some runs early."

Easier said than done for the Rays right now with their 2-1 series hole feeling a lot deeper than just a one-game deficit.