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WR Drake London, potential top-10 NFL draft pick, feels 'stronger, faster,' but doesn't run 40 at pro day

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The highlights that made Drake London worthy of being 1st WR drafted (2:19)

Watch the best plays from former USC wide receiver Drake London as he gets ready for the NFL. (2:19)

Potential top-10 NFL draft pick Drake London did not run the 40-yard dash at his official pro day Friday morning. London, who broke his ankle in late October, participated in a handful of cone drills and situational passing routes with several NFL scouts on hand at USC.

"Everybody has six to eight weeks, a couple months to really train for that, whether it's broad jump or vertical," London said of his decision to not run the 40-yard dash. "I was just trying to get back running."

London described the post-injury process as "painful," but added that his recovery was faster than expected. He said he started to jog at 6 mph on a treadmill about a week before the NFL combine in March and felt that, even this late in the draft process, it was important for him to have a pro day to show scouts that he could move the same way he did before the injury.

"My body feels better, stronger, faster," London said. "I think I just matured in the game. And then the day this is like my second year really playing wide receiver really playing football. So I feel better by the day."

Jordan Palmer and T.J. Houshmandzadeh helped conduct London's pro day, which featured scouts representing the Arizona Cardinals, Washington Commanders, San Francisco 49ers, New York Jets, Los Angeles Chargers, Tennessee Titans and Detroit Lions, among others. Detroit's senior personnel executive, John Dorsey, who has the No. 2 overall pick in the draft, also was in attendance.

When asked about concerns regarding his speed, London quipped: "Watch the film. At the end of the day, I really don't have to blow by guys to catch the ball. I mean, I can, but I don't have to."

London amassed over 2,000 receiving yards in three years at USC, including a 1,000-yard season in just eight games before his injury last year. The former dual-sport athlete came into USC looking to play both basketball and football, but turned to football full time for the first time in his life ahead of his junior season.

"Everybody knew where the ball was going," London said when asked about his ability to separate and excel despite the defense. "I had triple coverage, double coverage all game, and it still didn't stop me. So whatever they say about that, I could care less."