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U.S. Soccer spent three times more on men than women in 2015 fiscal year

The latest financial statements released by the U.S. Soccer Federation were highlighted by the considerable increase in men's national team expenses because of the 2014 World Cup.

The statements cover the fiscal period from April 1, 2014, until March 31, 2015, and revealed that $31.12 million was spent on the men's national team, up from $18.73 million for the prior year period.

By contrast, $10.31 million was spent on the women's national team, up from $8.27 million.

It should be noted that during the period in question, no major women's tournaments were held, though it did include some of the team's preparations for the 2015 Women's World Cup.

The costs associated with that tournament, which the U.S. won with an emphatic 5-2 victory over Japan in the final, won't be known until next year.

The USSF's costs related to the running of the National Women's Soccer League more than doubled to $1.43 million.

While the statements didn't break down revenue streams between various national teams, revenue from sponsorships, television, licensing and royalties was $37.06 million as compared to $28.70 million in 2013-14, with $5 million of that increase coming from a new sponsorship agreement with Nike that kicked in at the beginning of 2015.

National team game revenues were up over 50 percent, to $34.01 million.

There was no new information as it related to the respective salaries of men's manager Jurgen Klinsmann and women's counterpart Jill Ellis.

The report from the previous period indicated that Klinsmann's salary was $2.5 million, plus a performance bonus. Klinsmann's salary will escalate over the life of the contract.

Ellis' salary was reported to top out at $215,000 per year, but she has since signed a new contract in the wake of the U.S. triumph at the Women's World Cup.

With the Copa America Centenario now looking like it will go ahead, the USSF created a local organizing committee, and loaned the new organization $500,000 as a startup loan.