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U.S. Soccer CEO Dan Flynn further defines new general manager roles

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The U.S. Soccer Federation provided more detail on the requirements for the newly created GM positions for both the men's and women's senior national teams.

USSF CEO Dan Flynn stated on a conference call with reporters that the two positions would "vary a bit to some degree," but that the GM's duties would include the hiring and firing of the senior national team head coaches, overall responsibility for the technical side of the senior team, build a strong, integrated national team staff, management of the day-to-day environment, and monitor the player pool and integration of new players.

The GM will also need to work alongside the manager once that person is hired and will report directly to Flynn.

"The overall pool in terms of the environment, the travel, the scouting, the high performance, the nutrition, all of that needs to be managed in the process, so the GM will have other duties if you will," said Flynn. "But he'll have direct communication with the coach. I think the player pool is more GM than coach, and who actually plays is more coach than GM."

Flynn added that a committee comprised of USSF Board members Carlos Bocanegra and Angela Hucles, as well as several USSF staff members, including Flynn, COO Jay Berhalter, director of sporting development Ryan Mooney, and port development program director Nico Romeijn.

"That committee will work the process and make a recommendation to the Board of Directors," said Flynn.

In a departure from the tenure of Jurgen Klinsmann, who was given broad authority on matters that went beyond the senior team, Flynn indicated that the primary area of responsibility for the GMs will be their respective national teams.

"The GM is responsible for the senior team and senior team environment in a direct way. In an indirect way, those GMs will have input as to what we're doing on the player development side. But they have a primary [responsibility], and their key focus is managing the environment for the technical area for the men's senior and women's senior national team."

Mooney added, "Having integration and alignment will be critical. Obviously, there will be different demands at the level with the senior team, but having both those GMs be part of our internal think tank on the technical side with [Romeijn] is certainly what we are envisioning at this moment. There will certainly be an influence, but less so on the day-to-day."

When asked if the GM position would be like the role that Oliver Bierhoff plays with Germany's national team, Mooney said there would be some differences.

"These roles are not like for like with what it is that Oliver does with the senior team or what he does on the DFB academy side," he said. "There are certainly aspects of it that would be applicable to the GM role as we've defined them."

In terms of where the USSF will look to fill the positions, Flynn said that on the men's side the committee will look at the respective leagues on the men's and women's side. Seattle Sounders GM Garth Lagerwey has already been linked with the post.

"We think that there is fertile territory in MLS," said Flynn about the men's GM position. "We're looking beyond that level as well, in other parts of the world ... I think internally we think it's pretty darn important that our GM's understand our leagues -- plural -- in our country and how they operate, how they work, what the player development model is on the domestic side."

Flynn stated that the decision to create the two positions had been contemplated for a while, and wasn't in direct response to the failure of the U.S. men to qualify for the 2018 World Cup. He also said there was no specific timetable for when the positions might be filled, but "we are actively involved in the process right now."