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Washington's Jamin Davis motivated by former teammate Chris Oats, who suffered stroke in 2020

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Kentucky teammates find a way to honor Oats (6:04)

After linebacker Chris Oats is sidelined by medical emergency, his UK brothers take turns wearing his No. 22 jersey. (6:04)

ASHBURN, Va. -- When Kemberly Gamble watched the 2021 NFL draft at the urging of her son, one thought raced through her mind: My baby should be there. Instead, her baby, Chris Oats, was beside her in their two-bedroom apartment, fighting to regain full control of his body after a stroke he suffered in 2020.

And it was Oats' University of Kentucky teammate Jamin Davis hearing his name called in the first round instead of Oats. Davis had replaced his close friend and teammate in the lineup and turned himself into the 19th overall pick by the Washington Football Team.

As Oats works to do things like walk, talk and regain the use of his left side, Davis works to become a quality starter in the NFL for Washington, which plays the Seattle Seahawks on Monday night (8:15 p.m. ET, ESPN).

"The only thing Jamin could have done wrong," Gamble said, "is messed it up. You don't have to honor my son, just please remember him. That's what Jamin stands for. He doesn't owe my son anything. All he has to do is keep working. This is an opportunity that can be taken away at the drop of a hat."

Nobody knows that better than Oats. Nobody feels that responsibility more than Davis. They are tied together by friendship and the opportunity created by Oats' misfortune.

"The way the situation unfolded is just heartbreaking," Davis said.

In truth, Davis would have received an opportunity for more playing time his junior season after finishing strong as a sophomore. In his final three games of the 2019 regular season, he finished with a combined 19 tackles, including two for a loss. He's been steadily developing as a rookie starter for Washington.

"He's made a lot of progress," Washington linebackers coach Steve Russ said, "especially when it comes to keying and diagnosing and trusting his keys and responding quickly to what he knows. ... He's headed in the right direction. Very accountable; wants to be really, really good, has good work habits."

Dreaming of the NFL

Oats, a four-star recruit out of high school, was outstanding at times in his second season at Kentucky and the clear leader for one of two starting jobs available for the 2020 season. Oats' and Davis' close friend, DeAndre Square, was expected to win the other starting job. In one three-play sequence at the Belk Bowl vs. Virginia Tech at the end of the 2019 season, Oats shot through the line for consecutive tackles for a loss and then made an open-field tackle on third down.

"You're like, OK, this kid is about to take off," said Jon Sumrall, Kentucky's inside linebackers coach and co-defensive coordinator. "Chris was uniquely gifted. He's long, rangy, could run really well. In coverage, he did some stuff very easily because of his length and athleticism."

Said Davis: "We can talk for hours about how good a player Chris was. I remember the Belk Bowl. ... It was like, man, this mofo is going to the league."

That was Oats' dream since he was young, he said via text. In fact, Davis said he, Oats and Square -- a senior at Kentucky -- used to discuss becoming first-round picks. Right before the 2020 draft, the three were on a group text vowing to have their name called in future years.

Sumrall called them the three amigos.

"I wasn't out at the bars and partying or anything like that, so when I came across someone extremely similar to me in a lot of ways, I instantly clicked with Chris," Davis said.

They would talk, play video games (Fortnite, Madden and NBA 2K) and go to Buffalo Wild Wings once a week. Davis would order the boneless wings with barbecue sauce, mostly to provide more choices to the table. Oats would order barbecued chicken and potato wedges with cheese and bacon. Square opted for the garlic parmesan.

"I get memories on my Snapchat all the time," Davis said, "from when we were sitting in the locker room laughing or playing videos of Square dancing and me and Chris making fun of him. Outside of ball, all just going over to his house and playing video games or watching film together. Things like that made us closer."

Which made their next chapter more difficult.

Making Oats proud

The stroke occurred two days before Mother's Day in 2020, while Kentucky's players were at home because of the coronavirus pandemic. Sumrall informed his players, dispensing whatever information he could that Gamble OK'd. Players eventually realized the severity of the situation.

"I thought it was a sick joke," Davis said. "Then my thought was, 'Is he OK? Is there any way we can see him?'"

Sumrall noticed an almost immediate change in Davis when they returned to campus. His practice effort was never in question, but he started watching more film -- sometimes arriving a half-hour or 45 minutes early before meetings.

"It became like a snowball rolling down a hill," Sumrall said. "Every day he came into the meeting room with more intentional focus than ever before."

Davis felt it, too.

"It was like a reality check," he said. "Going forward we knew [Oats] wouldn't want us to sit around bummed out about the situation and feel pity or anything like that. So in my mind it's like you've got to step up and make him proud."

Square told Davis: It's your time now.

"He knew what he had to do," Square said. "We all knew Jamin was probably the best linebacker on the team. He had freakish athletic ability. We always said if he mentally gets the plays down, he'll probably start over any of us. We were just waiting for him to show it.

"He was ready for the moment."

Last season, Kentucky would rotate having a defensive player wear Oats' No. 22. Before a game against Mississippi State, Davis saw the 22 jersey in his locker. He looked to the locker next to him -- Oats' old nook that contained a picture of Chris.

"I said, 'I'll do my best to represent you tonight,'" Davis said.

He finished with 11 tackles and an interception.

Kentucky discontinued that practice this season -- it became difficult for the Oats family to see the No. 22 on the field. Instead, the team breaks down every practice with a "22!" Everyone has Oats Strong T-shirts made by Gamble; they're selling hoodies now, too.

Davis wears a 22 Oats Strong band on his wrist, leaving it on for some games. Sumrall said when Oats attends games, he takes the freshmen over to see him; he wants them to know someone who he said "will forever be a Wildcat."

'This is not your end'

While it's a constant battle for Oats, he isn't jealous of his friend. He watches Washington's games when he can and seeks out YouTube highlights. He will text Davis reminders to play fast, play smart. They text weekly; sometimes Davis checks in with Gamble. Oats said Davis' effort is there and "he just needs more time on that level."

"I'm not the selfish type," Oats said. "He got there because he is a freak athlete and his talent, and what I've learned during this hard time is that I will get there. It will just take time."

Oats was the one who pressed his family to watch the draft. They wanted to support Davis.

"We talked to Jamin before the draft," Gamble said. "We've always been supportive of everything, so [Chris] never felt, 'Man, that should have been me.' When Chris was able to talk after his stroke, or text, he told him, 'Go out and ball, this is your time.'"

But there is a definite understanding of his own situation.

"He knows where he could have been to change all our lives," Gamble said. "But I explained to him: As a mom, you being here and being able to touch you and not being six feet under -- because we've lost so many people this year -- that's all I need. He's an awesome kid; never in trouble. He went to school, got his scholarship and went to class and to be a year away from your dream and something like this happens, he doesn't understand what he did wrong for this to happen to him. That's where we encourage him and let him know, 'This is not your end; you have a bigger testimonial in your life.'"

Oats has 100% control of his right side and has increased his left side to 50% -- it was 40% just a month ago. He's able to stand on his own and they're working on strengthening his core to help him walk again. For now, he's doing occupational therapy twice a week, allowing him to slowly regain independence. They would like to get him into a physical therapy facility that deals mostly with athletes, key for his 6-foot-3, 227-pound frame.

He attended Kentucky's home games this season and saw the Wildcats play Georgia last year. His mom found it too tough to attend last year, but has gone this season. She reads her son for clues as to his emotions.

"I make sure I pay attention to his eyes and facial expressions," she said. "I can tell when it's too much. He does this thing with his eyes, they get real big and he bites on his fingernails. He's been like that since he was a kid. That hasn't changed since the stroke. When he's getting ready to tear up or holding back tears, his eyes get big."

He's constantly watching games, whether of Kentucky or other teams, and he attends high school games on Friday nights. Oats said he tries not to cry while watching games, "but I do get in my thoughts."

When that happens, he said he turns to a prayer from the book of Isaiah: "No weapon formed against me shall prosper."

He needed that prayer the first time he watched an NFL game after the stroke. He told his mom: "I should be playing." She said: "Just get healthy; it's a blessing you're alive. Football is just a job; it's not who you are."

The simple things

Gamble needed to quit her $11-an-hour florist job to take care of her son full time. She also moved the family into a larger apartment, though that increased her rent by $400. Her 26-year-old daughter, KeAirra, also helps, and Davis has chipped in. Insurance pays some of Oats' medical costs and a GoFundMe has raised more than $150,000 that helps with living expenses and allows them to buy a custom-made van.

Gamble proudly says they live within their means. But she does splurge for him once a year when it comes to sneakers. She would take some of her tax return money and buy him a pair of size 15 LeBrons, something she did again this past spring for $189. Though he's still on scholarship and gets shoes from Kentucky, he uses these in therapy.

"I don't spoil him or give everything he wants," she said, "but the simple things that people take for granted is joy for him."

Oats wants to become an announcer or a coach; he wants to stay around the game. He wants to get back to himself.

"Football is his first love, and it hurts," Gamble said. "I tell him to talk it out. He has anxiety over things. It was rough. This is a rough season for us, but he's making it."

Last month, Oats posted a picture on Twitter of himself, Square and Davis from a practice. Oats is sitting on the ground, his boys on either side. They are smiling. Sometimes he posts photos of the past; sometimes it's of the present.

But Davis said he doesn't need the photos to remember Oats' impact. He thinks of Oats, whether it's at practice or even on game day: "All the time; literally, it's all the time."

"It's a constant reminder that this could be taken at any given moment," Davis said. "There's no reason why you shouldn't go out and play like every snap will be your last. You should be early to meetings, doing whatever you can to go out and play ball and have fun. ... The only thing you can do in this situation is make him and his family proud. We'll always be close."

Oats said football remains a part of him. Right now, though, his proudest moments aren't about his tackles but rather something basic yet profound: "That I will be able to walk and talk again."